Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology: Ideas, Issues, and Applications

By Charles Crawford; Dennis L. Krebs | Go to book overview

Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology
Ideas, Issues, and Applications

Edited by Charles Crawford Simon Fraser University Dennis L. Krebs Simon Fraser University

LAWRENCE ERLBAUM ASSOCIATES, PUBLISHERS 1998 Mahwah, New Jersey London

-iii-

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Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology: Ideas, Issues, and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • About the Contributors xi
  • I - Ideas 1
  • 1: The Theory of Evolution in the Study of Human Behavior: An Introduction and Overview 3
  • Conclusion 38
  • References 38
  • 2 - Acting for the Good of Others: Kinship and Reciprocity with Some New Twists 43
  • References 81
  • Appendix: The Rare Gene Method for Modeling the Invasion of a Gene Affecting Relatives 84
  • 3 - How Mate Choice Shaped Human Nature: A Review of Sexual Selection and Human Evolution 87
  • Conclusion 119
  • Acknowledgments 120
  • References 121
  • 4 - The Evolution of Human Life Histories 131
  • References 153
  • 5 - Evolutionary Approaches to Culture 163
  • Conclusion 201
  • References 204
  • II - Issues 209
  • 6 - Can Behavior Genetics Contribute to Evolutionary Behavioral Science? 211
  • Conclusion 230
  • Conclusion 230
  • 7 - Evolutionary Psychology and Theories of Cognitive Architecture 235
  • Summary and Conclusions 262
  • Acknowledgments 263
  • References 263
  • 8 - Not Whether to Count Babies, but Which 265
  • References 271
  • 9 - Environments and Adaptations: Then and Now 275
  • Conclusion 299
  • References 299
  • 10 - Testing Evolutionary Hypotheses 303
  • Conclusion 333
  • References 333
  • III - Applications 335
  • 11 - The Evolution of Moral Behaviors 337
  • References 365
  • 12 - Developmental Psychology and Modern Darwinism 369
  • Concluding Remarks 398
  • Acknowledgments 399
  • References 399
  • 13 - The Psychology of Human Mate Selection: Exploring the Complexity of the Strategic Repertoire 405
  • Conclusion 427
  • References 428
  • 14 - The Evolutionary Social Psychology of Family Violence 431
  • Concluding Remarks 452
  • Acknowledgments 453
  • References 453
  • 15 - Psycho Darwinism: The New Synthesis of Darwin and Freud 457
  • Conclusion 477
  • Acknowledgments 480
  • References 480
  • 16 - Evolutionary Cognitive Psychology: The Missing Heart of Modern Cognitive Science 485
  • Conclusion 509
  • References 510
  • 17 - Evolutionary Psychology and Sexual Aggression 515
  • Summary and Conclusions 538
  • Acknowledgments 540
  • References 540
  • 18 - Darwinian Aesthetics 543
  • Concluding Remarks 567
  • Acknowledgments 568
  • References 569
  • 19 - The Global Environmental Crisis and State Behavior: An Evolutionary Perspective 573
  • References 591
  • 20 - The Evolutionary Psychology of Spatial Sex Differences 595
  • References 608
  • 21 - The Creation and Re-Creation of Language 613
  • Conclusion 630
  • References 631
  • Author Index 635
  • Subject Index 651
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