The Politics of the Feminist Novel

By Judi M. Roller | Go to book overview

man who inspires the woman. We never had a Mr. Muse." 83 For some of these authors, it appears true that "the step from rebellion to revolution is a step beyond nostalgia (for what one has known and hated and enjoyed defacing) toward the creation of new alternate values." 84 These authors are presenting new ideational worlds; they have "come upon strange, unfathomable, repellent, delightful things: we shall take them, we shall comprehend them." 85


NOTES
1.
Irving Howe, Politics and the Novel ( New York: Horizon Press, Inc., 1957), p. 227.
2.
Sam Bluefarb, The Escape Motif in the American Novel: Mark Twain to Richard Wright ( Columbus: Ohio State University Press, 1972), p. 3.
4.
Ihab Hassan, Radical Innocence: Studies in the Contemporary American Novel ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1961), p. 327.
6.
Thelma J. Shinn, "Women in the Novels of Ann Petry," Contemporary Women Novelists: A Collection of Critical Essays, ed. Patricia Meyer Spacks ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1977), p. 109.
7.
Bluefarb, The Escape Motif, p. 13.
8.
Ann Petry, The Street ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1946), pp. 434-35.
9.
Sandra M. Gilbert and Susan Gubar, The Madwoman in the Attic: The Woman Writer and the Nineteenth-Century Literary Imagination ( New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1979), p. 35.
10.
Agnes Smedley, Daughter of Earth ( 1929; reprint, Old Westbury, N.Y.: The Feminist Press, 1973), p. 406.
14.
Walter B. Rideout, The Radical Novel in the United States, 1900-1954: Some Interrelations of Literature and Society ( Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1956), p. 151.
15.
Doris Lessing, Landlocked ( New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1966), p. 503.

-132-

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The Politics of the Feminist Novel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - The Awakening 3
  • Notes 28
  • 2 - Authority and Autobiography 33
  • Notes 62
  • 3 - Fragmentation Versus Unity: The Shattered Novel 67
  • Notes 96
  • 4 - The Endings 101
  • Notes 132
  • 5 - Portrayals of Slavery and Freedom 137
  • Notes 175
  • 6 - Conclusion 181
  • Notes 187
  • Appendix - Critical Literature on the Political Novel 189
  • Notes 193
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 203
  • About the Author 206
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