The Politics of the Feminist Novel

By Judi M. Roller | Go to book overview

off their old prescribed roles, the heroines of the feminist novel move into a new world. It is a world their creators describe and fill with new images and new values. To understand this world, one must recognize the change in viewpoint and the resultant change in construction. It is a vision called into being in part by a modern world that needs it. The insights and portrayals of the feminist novel fight against the Machine and Nuclear Age, well described in The Dollmaker by the symbol of Oak Ridge: "A strange place it was . . . where people worked without knowing what they did, and never asked."130 The feminist novel not only asks; it suggests alternatives, alternatives generated from the world of "The Other."


NOTES
1.
Simone de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, ed. and trans. H. M. Parshley ( 1953; reprint, New York: Random House, 1974), p. 159.
2.
Nancy B. Evans, "The Value and Peril for Women of Reading Women Writers," Images of Women in Fiction: Feminist Perspectives, ed. Susan Koppelman Cornillon ( Bowling Green, Ohio: Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1972), p. 313.
3.
Barbara Currier Bell and Carol Ohmann, "Virginia Woolf's Criticism: A Polemical Preface." Feminist Literary Criticism: Explorations in Theory, ed. Josephine Donovan ( Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1975), p. 57.
4.
Joelynn Snyder-Ott, "The Female Experience and Artistic Creativity," Art Education 27 ( September 1974): 18.
5.
Germaine Bree, Women Writers in France: Variations on a Theme ( New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1973), p. 30.
6.
Ibid., p. 8.
7.
de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, p. 161.
8.
Nathan Irvin Huggins, Harlem Renaissance ( 1971; reprint, New York: Oxford University Press, Inc., 1974), p. 171.
9.
de Beauvoir, The Second Sex, p. 52.
10.
Irving Howe, Politics and the Novel ( New York: The New American Library, Inc., 1955), p. 36.
11.
Doris Lessing, A Ripple from the Storm ( New York: Simon and Schuster, Inc., 1966), p. 29.
12.
Marge Piercy, Small Changes ( 1972; reprint, Greenwich Conn.: Fawcett Publications, Inc., 1974), p. 373.
13.
Ibid., p. 100.

-175-

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The Politics of the Feminist Novel
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Women's Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • 1 - The Awakening 3
  • Notes 28
  • 2 - Authority and Autobiography 33
  • Notes 62
  • 3 - Fragmentation Versus Unity: The Shattered Novel 67
  • Notes 96
  • 4 - The Endings 101
  • Notes 132
  • 5 - Portrayals of Slavery and Freedom 137
  • Notes 175
  • 6 - Conclusion 181
  • Notes 187
  • Appendix - Critical Literature on the Political Novel 189
  • Notes 193
  • Bibliography 195
  • Index 203
  • About the Author 206
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