Supportive Supervision in Schools

By Raymond C. Garubo; Stanley William Rothstein | Go to book overview
behavior and impulsiveness into language that teachers (and students) can get a better idea about how they are acting in classrooms. Verbalization is the only way to increase their levels of consciousness so they can begin to neutralize and control disruptive and antisocial behaviors. Reflective teachers have an opportunity to develop greater inner controls in themselves and in the students with whom they work.
ACTIVITIES
1. Observe how often a supervisor works one-on-one with teachers. Are the conferences random affairs, occurring only when there are severe problems that need to be attended to? Or are they part of a regular routine? Do teachers speak openly to administrators, or are they guarded in their comments? Does trust dominate relationships? Write down some of your thoughts and be ready to present them to your class.
2. Set up a conferencing schedule with someone you can talk to easily. Talk about what you are doing in your classroom, and why you are doing those things. Then begin to talk more about the feelings that are being generated in your classroom or school. Who is involved in these interactions? Talk about this in some detail. What problems are these people causing you? Tell us more about this. What feelings can you express about them and about your own actions? Make sure you express feelings and not thoughts! What could you do to make things better? Write these ideas down so you can talk about them the next time you meet with any of these people.

NOTES
1.
Stanley W. Rothstein, "The Socialization of the School Administrator," Private School Quarterly (Spring 1983), pp. 52-60; Richard J. Altenbaugh, "Italian and Mexican Responses to Schooling: Assimilation or Resistance?" in Stanley W. Rothstein (ed.), Class, Culture and Race in American Schools: A Handbook ( Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1996), pp. 91-106; Basil Bernstein, Theoretical Studies towards a Sociology of Language, Vol. 1, Class, Codes and Control ( London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1975), pp. 12-17; R. A. Spitz, The First Year of Life ( New York: International Press, 1965), pp. 94-95; E. Kris, "The Recovery of Childhood Memories in Psychoanalysis," in The Psychoanalytic Study of the Child ( New York: International Universities Press, 1956), p. 76.
2.
Larry Cuban, How Teachers Taught: Constancy and Change in American Classrooms 1890-1980 ( New York: Longman, 1984), pp. 22-25; Basil Bernstein, The Structuring of Pedagogic Discourse, Vol. IV, Class, Codes and Control ( London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1990); F. Redl and D. Wineman, Children Who Hate ( New York: Free Press, 1951), pp. 29-44, 195-205; J. Lacan, "The Function of Language in Psychoanalysis," in W. E. Steinkraus (ed.), The Language of the Self ( Baltimore: John Hopkins, 1968), pp. 39.
3.
John Ogbu, Minority Education and Caste ( New York: Academic Press, 1978), pp. 220-228; F. Redl and D. Wineman, The Aggressive Child ( Glencoe, Ill.: Free Press, 1957), pp. 58-67, 284-302.
4.
Julia T. Wood, Relational Communication ( Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth Publish

-102-

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Supportive Supervision in Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Greenwood Educators'' Reference Collection ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Leadership Behavior in Schools 9
  • Summary 19
  • 2 - Leadership in Schools- An Overview 23
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - Leadership Skills- Understanding Group Dynamics 45
  • Summary 60
  • Notes 62
  • 4 - Basic Interpersonal Skills for Leaders 65
  • Notes 84
  • 5 - Psychological Insights- New Tools for School Leaders 87
  • Notes 102
  • 6 - The Supervisory Process and Organizational Change 105
  • Notes 125
  • 7 - The Administrative Process 129
  • Summary 143
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - Making Leadership Choices 147
  • Notes 152
  • Selected Bibliography 153
  • Index 161
  • About the Authors 165
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