Visions of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Fifteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

By Allienne R. Becker | Go to book overview

Here the play abruptly ends addressing the public: "Now light and off home with you" ( Jelinek76).


NOTES
1.
The German Carl von Knoblauch zu Hatzbach also uses this formula in his contribution to Miel Taschenbuch für Aufklärer und Nichtaufklärer auf das Jahr 1791 (quoted in Sturm and Völker 489-90).
2.
According to Klaniczay (187), it was the French politician Mirabeau ( 1749- 1791) who first coined this phrase in the 1770s.
3.
It can be assumed that Ewers, who had studied law, was influenced by the fashionable psychiatric discourse of his time, e.g., Kraft-Ebing famous Psychopathia sexualis ( 1886) where one can read of Mädchenschneider resembling the case of haemophiliac Frank Braun ( Ruthner41, 58).
4.
Passage translated by D. Matley.
5.
In essays such as "Warum ich ein Philosemit bin" ( "Why I am a Philosemite," 1916) Ewers imagined a union of German nationalists and Zionists with the aim of a German-Jewish cultural nation. Nevertheless this did not prevent him from publishing a Horst Wessel novel in 193 2, the epilogue of which states that it was published at Hitler's request (cf. Kugel esp. 105ff., 322ff.).
6.
In this conflict it is interesting to know that the belief in revenants (Wiedergänger) made up an integral part of the funeral rites of pagan Germanic peoples (cf. Lecouteux)
7.
The prejudice of Jewish "bloodsuckers" is now uttered anew e.g. by Louis Faffakhan, the minister of the Afro-American Islamic community: "So if they made profit from us, then from our life they drew life and came to strength. They turned it over to the Arabs, the Koreans and others, who are there now doing what? Sucking the lifeblood of our community." (Interview by Sylvester Monroe. Time. Feb. 28, 1994: 24-25, quoting 25.) For further examples of the presence of the post-1918 mythos analyzed here in the context of future revanchism see Geissler 98-9).
8.
A quote such as this contains apparently a cynical reference to Thomas Mann novel Der Zauberberg (The Magic Mountain), published 1924. Passage translated by D. Matley.

WORKS CITED

Arata Stephen A. "The Occidental Tourist: Dracula and the Anxiety of Reverse Colonization." Victorian Studies 33 ( 1989/90):621-45.

Baldick Chris. In Frankenstein Shadow: Myth, Monstrosity, and Nineteenth-century Writing. Oxford: Clarendon, 1987.

Barber Paul. Vampires, Burial and Death: Folklore and Reality. New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, 1988.

Bhalia Alok. Politics of Atrocity and Lust: The Vampire Tales as a Nightmare History of England in the Nineteenth Century. New Delhi, Bangalore: Sterling, 1990.

Büchner Georg. The Death of Danton in Georg Büchner: Complete Works and Letters.

-9-

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