Supportive Supervision in Schools

By Raymond C. Garubo; Stanley William Rothstein | Go to book overview
socioeconomic makeup, communities will have specific demands for their schools. Learning more about the families and people in the community is an important part of the school administrator's job.
2. The supervisor also has responsibilities. She should advise and participate in faculty councils, helping their members understand and involve themselves in the administration of the school. She is also responsible for school programs and policy decisions. She is responsible for the administration and supervision of instruction and serves as a resource person for teachers and faculty committees. For teachers and counselors who are having discipline or instructional problems, she provides individual and group conferences to help them identify and resolve their difficulties.
3. Administrators cannot accomplish all these tasks by themselves. They have to delegate, organize, and give responsibility to teachers and counselors who participate in the democratic operation of the school. With the responsibility for doing a particular task must come authority to take effective action and an accountability to the administration which empowers staff to act on its behalf. When the administrator gives staff the responsibility for certain areas of administration, she assumes the duty of supervising and coordinating their efforts and of helping staff to function as well as they can. She uses conferences, group meetings, seminars, and in-service training sessions to support and encourage teachers and counselors to become more conscious and more responsive to children.
4. Faculty want to work in rewarding professional environments. The administrator is responsible for the school climate and the morale of her staff; she is responsible for the educational and emotional relationships that develop in the school. She helps staff do their work, according to their own individual personalities and styles, within the framework of democratic educational practice. However, the school leader is not responsible for the emotional development of staff. She is only responsible for establishing a co-professional relationship with staff that provides an environment which allows them to grow and develop. She should help faculty improve their skills while teaching new faculty members to put into practice the knowledge and skills they already possess.
5. People are motivated best when they participate in the decision making process. Therefore administrators should seek to involve staff in the administration of the school whenever possible. How will they retain control over staff's actions? The controls will come from peer groups, common values and norms, and the demands of the community and the work itself. The administrator cannot completely control the behavior of staff. She can only structure situations so that the teaching and guidance activities are done with empathy and skill, so that teachers, counselors, and supervisors benefit from their efforts to reach common goals.

SUMMARY

The "how-to" of the communication system in democratic administration is learned in weekly staff conferences. These conferences are regularly scheduled meetings with teachers, counselors, and aides, which are held during the school day. Their length is often determined by their content and the time constraints of the school. These meetings provide supervisors and staff with a chance to

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Supportive Supervision in Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in the Greenwood Educators'' Reference Collection ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Leadership Behavior in Schools 9
  • Summary 19
  • 2 - Leadership in Schools- An Overview 23
  • Notes 42
  • 3 - Leadership Skills- Understanding Group Dynamics 45
  • Summary 60
  • Notes 62
  • 4 - Basic Interpersonal Skills for Leaders 65
  • Notes 84
  • 5 - Psychological Insights- New Tools for School Leaders 87
  • Notes 102
  • 6 - The Supervisory Process and Organizational Change 105
  • Notes 125
  • 7 - The Administrative Process 129
  • Summary 143
  • Notes 146
  • 8 - Making Leadership Choices 147
  • Notes 152
  • Selected Bibliography 153
  • Index 161
  • About the Authors 165
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