Visions of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Fifteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

By Allienne R. Becker | Go to book overview
comments on men's idealizationns of women's proper status.
2.
When Jewish myth did locate evil in a female being, it is significant that the being was fanciful, not part of human genealogy nor of the Bible: the demon Lilith. Moreover, the menace she supposedly represented--stealing babies was easily countered by the use of amulets and other simple measures not requiring an overhaul of human nature. Thus an accessible remedy was taught along with the danger.
3.
In Mesopotamian creation myths, the gods avoid manual labor by creating human beings to do it for them. The concept of people as slaves of the god(s) persists in proper names and liturgies of the major scriptural religions to this day. In society, those who could, escaped manual labor by forcing it on others. Greek, Roman, and Near Eastern systems of slavery are well known to us through laws and records as well as literature. Traditional Arabian ideology considered it more honorable to steal from cities and settlements (through raids) than to engage in manual labor. In the ideology of the ante-bellum American South, slavery was to be the basis for emulating the glory that was Greece and the grandeur that was Rome.
4.
Later these evolve into ethical issues, as when Talmud defines humiliating people as serious sin and organizes sanctity of Jewish life around the cessation of labor on the Sabbath.
5.
In our literatures, something between deviance and horror is often personified and individualized, then tamed into a freak--but a recuperable one--in the figure of the wild man, such as Esau or Enkidu.
6.
Many or all ancient texts were, according to our best understanding, designed to be read aloud or recited. Accordingly, one word in Hebrew means both "read" and "call out." Letters on clay tablets begin with instructions to the scribe to "say this to" the recipient.
7.
Enkidu ( Epic of Gilgamesh) is a wild semihuman being until intercourse with the prostitute civilizes him. Contrast Leslie Fiedler on man escaping women and civilization; and John Cawelti on the lone man patrolling the borders between civilization and savagery.
8.
The "civis" in this "civilization" is not a city in our sense but any village or town, any organized, stationary human settlement.
9.
Examples are the brothers' revenge for the rape of Dinah and Absalom's revenge on Amnon for the rape of Tamar.
10.
In Mesopotamian literature, fantasy figures are personified and individualized in the figure of the hero such as Gilgamesh, "one-third" god, through his mother, or in the figure of a king who depicts himself as under divine protection by claiming he has been "suckled," i.e., nurtured and protected, by goddesses. King Gilgamesh, son of the goddess Aruru, is therefore in big trouble when he incurs the enmity of Ishtar and a goddess turns against him.

WORKS CITED

Clark Elizabeth and Herbert Richardson. Eds. Women and Religion: A Feminist Sourcebook of Christian Thought. San Francisco: Harper, 1977.

Condren Mary. The Serpent and the Goddess: Women, Religion, and Power in Celtic Ireland. San Francisco: Harper, 1989.

Connerton Paul. How Societies Remember. Cambridge University Press. New York: Cambridge Univ. Press, 1989.

Davis Elizabeth Gould. The First Sex. New York: Penguin, 1971.

Dexter Miriam Robbins. Whence the Goddesses. A Source Book. New York: Pergamon, 1990.

Edwards Carolyn McVickar. "Shekhina: The Door to the Soul." Lilith Fall ( 1992): 5.

Eisler Riane. The Chalice and the Blade: Our History, Our Future. San Francisco: Harper and Row, 1987.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Visions of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Fifteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 212

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.