Visions of the Fantastic: Selected Essays from the Fifteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts

By Allienne R. Becker | Go to book overview

white as leprosy" and "thicks man's blood with cold."

Writing of his novel The Name of the Rose, Umberto Eco claims that "books always speak of other books" (quoted in Hutcheon, 128). While there may be no evidence that Stoker even thought of Shelley's novel when writing his own, there are sufficient parallels and resonances to make the case that a reading of Dracula benefits from a prior familiarity with the text of Frankenstein. The two monsters do indeed belong together.


NOTE
1.
For useful discussions, see the following: Judith Halberstam, "Technologies of Monstrosity: Bram Stoker's Dracula," Victorian Studies 36. 3 (Spring 1993): 333-352; Troy Boone , "'He is English and Therefore Adventurous': Politics, Decadence, and Dracula," Studies in the Novel 25. 1 (Spring 1993): 76-89; Stephen Arata, "The Occidental Tourist: Dracula and the Anxiety of Reverse Colonization," Victorian Studies 33. 4 (Summer 1990): 621-45; and Burton Hatlen, "The Return of the Repressed/Oppressed in Bram Stoker's Dracula," Minnesota Review 15 ( 1980): 80-97.

WORKS CITED

Craft Christopher. "Kiss Me with Those Red Lips': Gender and Inversion in Bram Stoker's Dracula." In Dracula: The Vampire and the Critics, Ed. Margaret L. Carter. Ann Arbor: Univ. of MI Press, 1988. 167-193.

Frayling Christopher. Vampyres: Lord Byron to Count Dracula. London: Faber & Faber.

Hutcheon Linda. A Politics of postmodernism. New York: Routledge, 1988.

Jackson Rosemary. Fantasy. The Literature of Subversion. London: Methuen, 1981.

Ludlam Harry. A Biography of Dracula: The Life Story of Bram Stoker. London: Foulsham, 1962.

Mellor Anne. Mary Shelley. Her Life, Her Fiction, Her Monsters. New York: Routledge, 1989.

Roth Phyllis. Bram Stoker. Boston: Twayne, 1982.

Shelley Mary. Frankenstein. ( 1831). New York: Penguin, 1983.

Skal David. The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror. New York: Norton, 1993.

Stoker Bram. The Essential Dracula: The Definitive and Annotated Edition of Bram Stoker's Classic Novel. Ed. Leonard Wolf. New York: Penguin, 1993.

Varma Devendra. "Dracula's Voyage: From Pontus to Hellespontus." In Dracula: The Vampire and the Critics, Ed. Margaret L. Carter. Ann Arbor: Univ. of MI Press, 1988. 207-213.

-129-

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