The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2

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M

Macbeth was an opera in three acts with a libretto by Claude-Joseph Rouget de Lisle, a score by Hippolyte Chélard,* and choreography by Pierre Gardel (see eighteenth-century volume for Rouget de Lisle and Gardel). It had its premiere at the Royal Academy of Music on 29 June 1827, but the work had little success despite the enthusiasm it was to inspire later in Munich and England: it had to be dropped from the repertory after its fifth performance on 13 July 1827.

The tragedy opens in Macbeth's camp, where his loyal soldiers are thinking of laying down their arms because their leader has disappeared, but Lenox and Douglas order them to scour the forest lest the three witches of the region find him and do him harm (I, 1-2). The scene shifts to the witches' cave, where Groeme and Elsie are about to prepare a brew (I, 3). Nona enters to announce that she has Macbeth in her power and is guiding his steps to their cave. They finish their potion and summon the spirits of hell to help them; they disappear before Macbeth enters (I, 4). Perplexed Macbeth sits down to rest, and the witches return to tell him that he is destined to become Thane of Cawdor and king of Scotland (I, 5-6). Alone again, Macbeth is tempted by the possibility of becoming king, but he suppresses this ambition in favor of remaining a faithful and stalwart subject (I, 7). He is found by his soldiers, and he is cited for valor by Prince Douglas, who adds that Duncan is waiting to welcome Macbeth to Inverness as Thane of Cawdor, a

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The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • M 790
  • N 916
  • O 955
  • P 990
  • Q 1080
  • R 1081
  • S 1171
  • T 1286
  • V 1338
  • W 1386
  • X 1404
  • Y 1406
  • Z 1409
  • Appendix: The Repertory, 1815-1914 1422
  • Index 1467
  • About the Author 1555
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