The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2

By Spire Pitou | Go to book overview

N

Nabucco, by Giuseppe Verdi* is discussed in the twentieth-century volume.

Namouna was a ballet in two acts and three tableaux with a scenario by Charles Nuitter* and Lucien Petipa,* a score by Edouard Lalo* and Charles Gounod,* and choreography by Petipa. Its sets were designed by Rubé and Chaperon (tabl. 1, 2) and Lavastre jeune (tabl. 3); its costumes were created by Eugène Lacoste. It had its world premiere at the National Academy of Music on 6 March 1882.

The ballet is set in a casino at Corfu during the seventeenth century. Lord Adriani has lost all his money and his ship to Count Ottavio. He tries to recoup his losses by wagering his favorite slave, Namouna, against the count's winnings, but he loses again. Ottavio gives Lord Adriani's ship and money to Namouna. The grateful slave kisses Ottavios' hand and gives him half a flower that she extracts from her girdle, (I, 1).

It is dawn, and Count Ottavio pays the musicians who have been serenading Héléna. Jealous Adriani appears and seizes the opportunity to start a quarrel with Ottavio. He attacks the musicians with the flat of his sword and insults Ottavio. A duel begins. A sleeping slave awakens and runs off only to return with a veiled dancer. She offers the swordsmen flowers and dances between them. She attracts such a crowd of onlookers that the men have to put aside their swords.

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The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • M 790
  • N 916
  • O 955
  • P 990
  • Q 1080
  • R 1081
  • S 1171
  • T 1286
  • V 1338
  • W 1386
  • X 1404
  • Y 1406
  • Z 1409
  • Appendix: The Repertory, 1815-1914 1422
  • Index 1467
  • About the Author 1555
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