The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2

By Spire Pitou | Go to book overview

S

Sacountala was a ballet in two acts with a score by Louis-Etienne-Ernest Reyer,* a libretto by Théophile Gautier,* and choreography by Lucien Petipa.* It had its world premiere at the Opéra on 14 July 1858, and its first run of 15 performances lasted until 17 September 1858. It was revived for another seven stagings in 1859-60, but the public was unimpressed by it despite Mme Amalia Ferraris'* skill, and it had to be dropped from the repertory on 1 February 1860 after its 20th representation.

The ballet opens with Canova, head of the Brahmans, interrupted at his prayers by King Dauchmanta (I, 1-2). The latter hides behind a tree to avoid the group of girls who take care of the temple. The leader of these attendants is Sacountala, who is protected from an angry bee by Dauchmanta. Sacountala rewards her rescuer with baskets of fruit and flowers (I, 3-4). After the king's presence is revealed, one of his hunters tells him that he must kill a mad elephant ravaging the countryside. His departure leaves Sacountala downcast. She falls asleep, but Dauchmanta awakens her on his return and declares is love to her. He gives her a ring as a sign of their betrothal (I, 5-7). The hermit Durwasas is annoyed by their indifference toward him because they are in a sacred place and Sacountala should be concerned with giving him food and drink after his travels. A dispute arises, and the angry hermit calls upon his demons to torment the engaged couple, and he causes the king to lose his reason and memory. The delirium of Dauchmanta

-1171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • M 790
  • N 916
  • O 955
  • P 990
  • Q 1080
  • R 1081
  • S 1171
  • T 1286
  • V 1338
  • W 1386
  • X 1404
  • Y 1406
  • Z 1409
  • Appendix: The Repertory, 1815-1914 1422
  • Index 1467
  • About the Author 1555
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.