The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2

By Spire Pitou | Go to book overview

V

Vaëz, Jean-Nicolas-Gustave van Nieuwenhuysen DIT (b. 6 December 1812, Brussels; d. 12 March 1862, Paris), librettist, was about to study law at age 18, when he decided to become a poet. He did a few reasonably successful plays for the theatres of his native city between 1829 and 1834 before going to Paris in the hope of making a name for himself by collaborating with Alphonse Royer.*

The co-authors' first project was to create a French version of Domenico Gaetano Donizetti* Lucie de Lammermoor* that was mounted initially at the Théâtre Royal de la Monnaie in Brussels on 5 September 1839 before coming to the Paris Opéra on 20 February, 1846. Their libretto for Donizetti La Favorite* of 1840 was their happiest achievement, and this work was well on its way to its 500th performance at the outbreak of the Franco- Prussian War. Encouraged, the writers did the translation into French of Gioacchino Rossini* Othello* in 1844, and, as just indicated, they saw their version of Lucie de Lammermoor produced in its entirety at the Opéra for the first time in 1846. They integrated excerpts from Rossini's works to create Robert Bruce* this same year, but the public was not impressed by thier pastiche, and, in 1847, they completed their last text for the Opéra, a French adaptation of Giuseppe Verdi's * I Lombardi alla prima crociata ( Milan, 1843) that they named Jérusalem.*

Vaëz worked with Royer on another dozen compositions billed at the Vaudeville, Gaîté, Variétés, and especially the Odéon, where Royer was director with Vaëz as adjunct director before

-1338-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • M 790
  • N 916
  • O 955
  • P 990
  • Q 1080
  • R 1081
  • S 1171
  • T 1286
  • V 1338
  • W 1386
  • X 1404
  • Y 1406
  • Z 1409
  • Appendix: The Repertory, 1815-1914 1422
  • Index 1467
  • About the Author 1555
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.