The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2

By Spire Pitou | Go to book overview

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La Xacarilla was an opera in a single act with a score by Count Aurelio Marliani and a libretto by Eugène Scribe.* It had its world premiere at the Opéra on 28 October 1839, and its brevity made it such a suitable companion piece for longer works that it was offered in 19 of the 25 years in the 1839-64 period. It was produced on 113 dates, and it was not dropped from the repertory until 4 March 1864. Its best year was 1849, when it was mounted on 17 occasions, but it was usually produced on fewer than four programs each year.

The intrigue of La Xacarilla begins with the revelation that Lazarillo has promised his sweetheart in Burgos that he will not return to her until he is wealthy or dead, although he has landed in Cadiz without money but in good health. After he gets out of quarantine, he sets out to find a free meal. He is unsuccessful and tries to sleep on a bench and hears the same xacarilla for the second time. Also, he notices that the door of the house opposite him opens for the singers each time that this song is sung. He decides to have recourse to the ruse of singing the xacarilla and thereby opening the door. Perhaps he will find food and shelter within the house (sc. 1-3). Inevitably, Cojuelo asks him to enter the house after he sings the "magic" song. Lazarillo learns that Cojuelo is giving his daughter until the morrow to select a husband, and she is wondering what course of action to follow, when Lazarillo recognizes her as his Burgos sweetheart. They declare their love to each other and wonder what her father would say and do if he knew that

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The Paris Opera: An Encyclopedia of Operas, Ballets, Composers, and Performers Growth and Grandeur, 1815-1914 - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • M 790
  • N 916
  • O 955
  • P 990
  • Q 1080
  • R 1081
  • S 1171
  • T 1286
  • V 1338
  • W 1386
  • X 1404
  • Y 1406
  • Z 1409
  • Appendix: The Repertory, 1815-1914 1422
  • Index 1467
  • About the Author 1555
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