Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine, and Society in Assisted Life and Death

By Larry I. Palmer | Go to book overview

two biological parents--a father with whom she lives and a mother whom she visits periodically. Mr. Stem's marriage to Mrs. Stern remains a public fact; their family relationships are private and inviolate.

Inviting legislative consideration--but not necessarily requiring legislative action--is an appropriate judicial response to a complex public policy issue. It considers all the implications of new ways of conceiving children. Simultaneously, such consideration respects the competing visions of family. A legislative analysis of public policy regarding family creation must hear themes of liberty and traditions while listening to discordant views of interest groups.

Legislative analysis is imperative in an age in which our beginnings are biotechnologically complex: public policy options must be created as well as explored. Generational continuity posits choices throughout life, as well as at its end: prolonging life and physician-assisted death are personal decisions with public policy implications. As I probe these ethical issues, bear in mind that my mode of analysis cannot negate "traditional" values or contemporary scientific realities. Nor can I deny the loss of self that occurs with debilitating conditions or aging. The continuity of life means that I must acknowledge losses as well as gains.

When it comes to the institution of the family, individual decisions to become parents are obviously influenced by economic and social incentives. But these decisions may be equally driven by notions of individual continuity--egos--that are mysterious to others as well as to individuals. The family as an institution, however, is currently arranged, and periodically rearranged, through courts and legislatures. In a world of diverse family arrangements, our sense of community will come only if we pay attention to institutional arrangements that are clearly matters of public concern.


NOTES
1.
In the Matter of Baby M, 109 N.J. 396, 469, 537 A. 2d 1227, 1264 ( 1988).
2.
Kass v. Kass, 91 N.Y. 2d 554, 696 N.E. 2d 174, 673 N.Y.S. 2d 350 ( 1998).
3.
R. R. v. M. H., 426 Mass. 501, 689 N.E. 2d 790 ( 1998).
4.
Buzzanca v. Buzzanca, 61 Cal. 1410, 72 Cal. Rptr. 280 ( 1998).
5.
Doe v. Doe, 246 Conn. 652, 717 A. 2d 706 ( 1998).
6.
Janet L. Dolgin, Defining the Family: Law, Technology, and Reproduction in an Uneasy Age ( New York: New York University Press, 1997), 176-212.
7.
John A. Robertson, "Liberty, Identity, and Human Cloning," Texas Law Review 76 ( 1998): 1371-456.
8.
Kass v. Kass, 91 N.Y. 2d 544, 563.
9.
R. R. v. M. H., 426 Mass. 501, 689 N.E. 2d 790 ( 1998).
10.
Ibid., 513.
11.
Alabama: Code of Ala. § 26-1OA-34 ( 1999); Arkansas: Ark. Stat. Ann .§ 9- 10-201 ( 1997); Florida: Fla. Stat. § 742.15 ( 1998); Iowa: Iowa Code § 710.11 ( 1997);

-34-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine, and Society in Assisted Life and Death
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.