Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine, and Society in Assisted Life and Death

By Larry I. Palmer | Go to book overview

dying. Most of us are ill-equipped to be present through the long process of another's dying on an hourly or even daily basis. Dying erodes our own sense of order of the social universe, leading to our need for institutional responses: hospitals, retirement "communities," nursing homes, hospice programs, and residential facilities.


NOTES
1.
Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas ( New York: Penguin, 1938), 20.
2.
Martha C. Nussbaum, Poetic Justice: The Literary Imagination and Public Life ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1995), 56-86.
3.
See Einer Elhauge, "Allocating Health Care Morally," California Law Review 82 ( 1994): 449-544. Elhauge notes that other industrialized nations, such as Britain and Sweden, have introduced market reforms which are moving them toward cost containment. See ibid., n.1.
4.
"Indicators: Health Care Spending," OECD Observer 215 ( January 1999): 50.
5.
World Health Statistics Annual 1996 ( Geneva: World Health Organization, 1998).
6.
Physicians will need the assistance of other "experts" to create such systems in the more complex and dynamic economic environment. For instance, within so-called "capitated systems"--where physicians are paid a fixed amount for each patient for whom they serve as the primary-care provider--physicians should invite professionals with expertise in "total quality service" to become an integral part of their professional practices. These finance managers will help physicians serve their many "customers"--who include not just patients, but government reimbursement officials and managers from managed care companies.

Physicians as sole practitioners--as independent small business persons--or in partnerships with a few other similarly trained specialists may become economically unviable. Pediatricians, internists, and family practitioners--three distinct medical specialities--might consider forming partnerships, because managed care companies classify all as potential "primary-care physicians." These cross-specialty professional combinations may provide the organizational setting for achieving both monetary efficiency and effective patient care. See generally, Einer Elhauge, "Allocating Health Care Morally,"473-74.

7.
See generally Paula A. Rochon, "Drug Therapy," Lancet 346 ( July 1, 1995): 32-36 for the inadequacy of pain managment education and guidelines for physicians. Compounding the problem is the fact that health care providers are rarely accurate in their impressions of how much pain their patients are experiencing, particularly when that pain is severe. See, for example, Stuart A. Grossman et al., "Correlation of Patient and Caregiver Ratings of Cancer Pain," Journal of Pain Symptom and Management 6 ( February 6, 1991): 53-57 (finding that nurses, house officers, and oncology fellows correctly assessed pain levels in their cancer patients 7 percent, 20 percent, and 27 percent of the time, respectively).
8.
Other theories of breach of physician-patient fiduciary duty are developing in recent years. One patient, whose blood cells contained a rare form of DNA,

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Endings and Beginnings: Law, Medicine, and Society in Assisted Life and Death
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 146

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.