Pacific-Asia and the Future of the World-System

By Ravi Arvind Palat | Go to book overview

6
AGRO-FOOD RESTRUCTURING IN THE PACIFIC RIM: A COMPARATIVE- INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, THE UNITED STATES, AUSTRALIA, AND THAILAND

Philip McMichael


INTRODUCTION

Analysis of the current restructuring of world capitalism invariably focuses on industrial dynamics, in particular the consequences of the recent process of decentralization of industry to the high-income periphery. Often ignored is the related, but inverse, process of agricultural centralization in states. Nowhere is this clearer than in the Pacific Rim, where East Asian (e.g., Japanese and South Korean) agro-food markets provide the most significant growth potential for agricultural exporters like the United States and Australia. This division of world labor in agriculture is not quite so centralized, however, as some peripheral countries such as Thailand have adopted industrial agriculture and rival the United States as agro-food exporters. 1

More significant than a reconfiguration of international trade is the broader question of the "internationalization" of agriculture and its relationship to international political economy. Thailand's successful agro-export substitution strategies (high-value food products for traditional tropical commodities) are one example of the internationalization of Third World economies ( Raynolds, Myhre, McMichael, Carro- Figueroa, & Buttel, 1991). The recent expansion in the periphery of agro-industrial production and of so-called "nontraditional exports" has exacerbated tensions in the state system and reflects an of global capital mobility. In turn, an aggressive U.S. agricultural export policy is symptomatic of U.S. hegemonic decline and industrial decentralization. This shift in the international division of labor has fueled considerable, neomercantilist, GATT-style pressure on East Asian states to liberalize their farm sectors and expand agro-food imports. 2 The change thus exemplifies heightened international and national tensions in the world-economy, as well as the U.S.'s need to mobilize international enforcement mechanisms to maintain competitive advantage in an increasingly competitive world-economy. The goal of

-103-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pacific-Asia and the Future of the World-System
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.