Global Double Zero: The INF Treaty from Its Origins to Implementation

By George L. Rueckert | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Eliminations

Altogether, some 8,000 treaty-limited items, including 2,602 nuclear missiles on both sides, were destroyed under the INF Treaty. The U.S. destroyed 2,000 TLIs, including 846 missiles--677 longer-range Pershing-IIs and GLCMs and 167 shorter-range Pershing-IAs. The Soviets eliminated 6,000 TLIs, including 1,846 missiles--889 longer-range SS- 20s, SS-4s, SS-5s, and SSC-X-4 GLCMs and 957 shorter-range SS-12s and SS-23s. The Treaty's Protocol on Eliminations defined what was to be destroyed; when, how, and where this was to be done; and how it was to be verified.


BASIC PROVISIONS

What Is to Be Destroyed?

The INF Treaty required the Soviet Union and the United States to destroy all ground-launched INF missile systems with ranges between 500 and 5,500 kilometers. This included infrastructure, but not nuclear warheads, guidance systems, and certain other salvageable items.

Nuclear warheads and guidance systems were exempted since the destruction of INF missiles and launchers effectively resolved the military threat by removing the ability to deliver the nuclear warheads assigned to these weapons. Moreover, verification of warhead and guidance system destruction would have posed insurmountable difficulties, since land- based INF warheads and guidance systems would have had to be clearly differentiated from those for sea-based systems and from strategic and

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