Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

which will give the United States a navy, is probably now quickening in the Central American Isthmus. Let us hope it will not come to the birth too late.


FURTHER READINGS

Cooling Benjamin F., Gray Steel and Blue Water Navy ( Hamden, Conn.: Archon Books, 1979).

Drake Frederick C., The Empire of the Seas ( Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 1984).

Herrick Walter, The American Naval Revolution ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana University Press, 1966).

LaFeber Walter, The New Empire ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1963).

Seager Robert, Alfred Thayer Mahan ( Annapolis, Md.: Naval Institute Press, 1977).

Turk Richard W., The Ambiguous Relationship: Theodore Roosevelt and Alfred Thayer Mahan ( New York: Greenwood Press, 1987).


DOCUMENT 15
McKinley's War Message to Congress

On 11 April 1898 President William McKinley outlined to Congress the reasons why he believed that the United States should take steps to end the conflict between Spain and the people of Cuba.15


TO THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES:

It becomes my duty to now address your body with regard to the grave crisis that has arisen in the relations of the United States to Spain by reason of the warfare that for more than three years has raged in the neighboring island of Cuba.

I do so because of the intimate connection of the Cuban question with the state of our own Union and the grave relation the course which it is now incumbent upon the nation to adopt must needs bear to the traditional policy of our Government if it is to accord with the precepts laid down by the founders of the Republic and religiously observed by succeeding Administrations to the present day.

____________________
15
James D. Richardson, editor, A Compilation of Messages and Papers of the Presidents (N.p.: Bureau of National Literature and Arts, 1909), 14:6281-92, passim.

-30-

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