Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

FURTHER READINGS FOR DOCUMENTS 15-18

Beisner Robert L., From the Old Diplomacy to the New ( Wheeling, Ill.; Harlan Davidson, 1986).

-----, Twelve Against Empire ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985).

Foner Philip S., The Spanish-Cuban-American War and the Birth of American Imperialism ( New York: Monthly Press Review, 1972).

Gould Lewis L., The Spanish-American War and President McKinley ( Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1983).

Offner John, An Unwanted War: The Diplomacy of the United States and Spain Over Cuba, 1895-1898 (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1992).

Trask David F., The War with Spain in 1898 ( New York: Macmillian, 1981).

Williams William A., The Roots of the Modern American Empire ( New York: Random House, 1969).

-----, The Tragedy of American Diplomacy ( New York: Norton, 1988).


DOCUMENT 19
The Open Door Notes

Secretary of State John Hay responded to a possible threat to American access to the China market on 6 September 1899 by asking the governments of England, France, Germany, Russia, Italy, and Japan "to retain there an open market for the commerce of the world." While the other Great Powers generally gave the Open Door policy a cool reception, Hay nonetheless announced on 20 March 1900 that "final and definitive" assent had been received.19


SECRETARY HAY TO THE AMBASSADOR IN GREAT BRITAIN

Washington, September 6, 1899

Sir: The Government of Her Britannic Majesty has declared that its policy and its very traditions precluded it from using any privileges which might be granted it in China as a weapon for excluding commercial rivals, and that freedom of trade for Great Britain in that Empire meant freedom of trade for all the world alike. While conceding by formal agreements, first with Germany

____________________
19
The China White Paper ( Stanford, CA.: Stanford University Press, 1967), Annexes, 414-16.

-38-

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