Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

DOCUMENT 34
The Ludlow Amendment

Representative Louis Ludlow sought to isolate the United States still further from foreign wars by introducing legislation for a 22nd Amendment to the Constitution.34 The Ludlow Amendment would have, in most cases, required a national referendum before the United States could go to war. After intense lobbying by President Roosevelt, a motion to discharge Ludlow's resolution from committee failed by a vote of 209-188.

SECTION 1. Except in case of attack by armed forces, actual or immediately threatened, upon the United States or its Territorial possessions, or by any non- American nation against any country in the Western Hemisphere, the people shall have the sole power by a national referendum to declare war or to engage in warfare overseas. Congress, when it deems a national crisis to exist in conformance with this article, shall by concurrent resolution refer the question to the people.


FURTHER READINGS FOR DOCUMENTS 33-34

Adler Selig, The Isolationist Impulse ( New York: Abelard-Schuman, 1957).

Anderson Irvine H., The Standard-Vacuum Oil Company and United States East Asian Policy ( Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1975).

Cole Wayne S., Roosevelt and the Isolationists ( Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983).

_____, Senator Gerald P. Nye and American Foreign Relations ( Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1962).

Divine Robert A., The Illusion of Neutrality ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962).

Guinsburg Thomas N., The Pursuit of Isolationism in the United States Senate from Versailles to Pearl Harbor ( New York: Garland, 1982).

Jonas Manfred, Isolationism in America ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1966).

Koginos Manny T., The Panay Incident ( Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University Studies, 1967).

Wiltz John, From Isolation to War, 1919-1939 ( Arlington Heights, Ill.: Harlan Davidson, 1971).

____________________
34
Congressional Record ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office), 83, part 9: Appendix, 207.

-74-

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