Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

Article 10

The Parties may, by unanimous agreement, invite any other European state in a position to further the principles of this Treaty and to contribute to the security of the North Atlantic area to accede to this Treaty. Any state so invited may become a party to the Treaty by depositing its instrument of accession with the Government of the United States of America. The Government of the United States of America will inform each of the Parties of the deposit of each such instrument of accession.


FURTHER READINGS

Ireland Timothy P., Creating the Entangling Alliance (Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1981).

Kaplan, Lawrence S., The United States and NATO ( Lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1984).

Osgood Robert, NATO: The Entangling Alliance ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1962).

Pach Jr., Chester J., Arming the Free World: The Origins of the United States Military Assistance Program, 1945-1950 (Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press, 1991).

Reid Escott, Time of Fear and Hope: The Making of the North Atlantic Treaty ( Toronto: McClelland and Stewart, 1977).


DOCUMENT 48
The China White Paper

Secretary of State Dean Acheson attempted to explain how Communist forces under Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung) had defeated the Nationalist Government of China headed by Jiang Jieshi (Chiang Kai-shek) in a compilation of documents entitled The China White Paper.48 In spite of Acheson's declaration that "the unfortunate but inescapable fact is that the ominous result of the civil war in China was beyond the control of the government of the United States," critics would cotinue to charge that the Truman administration had "lost" China to communism.

____________________
48
The China White Paper (Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 1967), iii-xvii, passim.

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