Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

belief in the freedom of man. And I am equally convinced that history will record the fact that this bitter struggle reached its climax in the late 1950's and the early 1960's. Let me then make clear as the President of the United States that I am determined upon our system's survival and success, regardless of the cost and regardless of the peril!


FURTHER READINGS

Giglio James N., The Presidency of John F. Kennedy ( Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1991).

Higgins Trumbull, The Perfect Failure: Kennedy, Eisenhower and the Bay of Pigs ( New York: Norton, 1987).

Morley Morris, Imperial State and Revolution: The United States and Cuba, 1952- 1986 ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).

Parmet Herbert S., JFK ( New York: Dial Press, 1983).

Smith Wayne S., The Closest of Enemies: A Personal and Diplomatic Account of U.S.- Cuban Relations since 1957 ( New York: Norton, 1987).

Welch Richard W., Response to Revolution: The United States and the Cuban Revolution, 1959-1961 ( Chapel Hill : University of North Carolina Press, 1985).

Wyden Peter, Bay of Pigs ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1979).


DOCUMENT 55
The Cuban Missile Crisis

On 22 October 1962 President John Kennedy informed the people of the United States of the presence of nuclear missile sites on Cuba.55 The United States and Soviet Union remained on the brink of a nuclear confrontation until 28 October, when Nikita Khrushchev promised to withdraw the missiles.


GOOD EVENING, MY FELLOW CITIZENS:

This Government, as promised, has maintained the closest surveillance of the Soviet military buildup on the island of Cuba. Within the past week, unmistakable evidence has established the fact that a series of offensive missile sites is now in preparation on that imprisoned island. The purpose of these

____________________
55
Public Papers of the Presidents: John F. Kennedy, 1962 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1963), 806-9.

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 190

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.