Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

Morley Morris, Imperial State and Revolution: The United States and Cuba, 1952- 1987 ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).

Parmet Herbert S., JFK ( New York: Dial Press, 1983). Paterson Thomas G., editor, ( New York: Oxford University Press, 1989).


DOCUMENT 56
The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution

President Lyndon Baines Johnson, who alleged that North Vietnamese patrol boats had attacked U.S. naval vessels in international waters, received authorization on 7 August 1964 from Congress "to take all necessary measures to repel any armed attack against the forces of the United States and to prevent further aggression."56Johnson would later use the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution to americanize the war in South Vietnam.


TO PROMOTE THE MAINTENANCE OF INTERNATIONAL PEACE AND SECURITY IN SOUTHEAST ASIA

Whereas naval units of the Communist regime in Vietnam, in violation of the principles of the Charter of the United Nations and of international law, have deliberately and repeatedly attacked United States naval vessels lawfully present in international waters, and have thereby created a serious threat to international peace; and

Whereas these attacks are part of a deliberate and systematic campaign of aggression that the Communist regime in North Vietnam has been waging against its neighbors and the nations joined with them in the collective defense of their freedom; and

Whereas the United States is assisting the peoples of southeast Asia to protect their freedom and has no territorial, military or political ambitions in that area, but desires only that these peoples should be left in peace to work out their own destinies in their own way: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled.

____________________
56
Gareth Porter, editor, Vietnam: A History in Documents ( N.Y.: New American Library, 1981), 286-87.

-151-

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