Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

That the Congress approves and supports the determination of the President, as Commander in Chief, to take all necessary measures to repel any armed attack against the forces of the United States and to prevent further aggression.

SEC. 2. The United States regards as vital to its national interest and to world peace the maintenance of international peace and security in southeast Asia. Consonant with the Constitution of the United States and the Charter of the United Nations and in accordance with its obligations under the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty, the United States is, therefore, prepared, as the President determines, to take all necessary steps, including the use of armed force, to assist any member or protocol state of the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty requesting assistance in defense of its freedom.

SEC. 3. This resolution shall expire when the President shall determine that the peace and security of the area is reasonably assured by international conditions created by the action of the United Nations or otherwise, except that it may be terminated earlier by concurrent resolution of the Congress.


FURTHER READINGS

Berman Larry, Planning a Tragedy: The Americanization of the War in Vietnam ( New York: Norton, 1982).

-----, Lyndon Johnson's War ( New York: Norton, 1989).

Herring George C., America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975 ( New York: Wiley, 1979).

Kahin George, Intervention: How America Became Involved in Vietnam ( New York: Knopf, 1986).

Karnow Stanley, Vietnam: A History ( New York: Viking Press, 1983).

Rotter Andrew J., The Path to Vietnam ( Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1987).

Young Marilyn B., The Vietnam Wars ( New York: HarperCollins, 1991).


DOCUMENT 57
Clark Clifford and the Reappraisal of U.S. Policy toward the War in Vietnam

In the wake of the Tet offensive President Johnson asked Secretary of Defense Clark Clifford to chair a task force that would determine how an additional 200, 000 troops could be sent to South Vietnam. Instead, as Clifford explained in an article in Foreign Affairs, he emerged from these discussions not only

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