Two Centuries of U. S. Foreign Policy: The Documentary Record

By Stephen J. Valone | Go to book overview

tonight I am announcing a major new step for a further reduction in U.S. and Soviet manpower in Central and Eastern Europe to 195,000 on each side. This level reflects the advice of our senior military advisers. It's designed to protect American and European interests and sustain NATO's defense strategy. A swift conclusion to our arms control talks--conventional, chemical, and strategic--must now be our goal. And that time has come.

Still, we must recognize an unfortunate fact: In many regions of the world tonight, the reality is conflict, not peace. Enduring animosities and opposing interests remain. And thus, the cause of peace must be served by an America strong enough and sure enough to defend our interests and our ideals. It's this American idea that for the past four decades helped inspire this Revolution of '89.


FURTHER READINGS

Beschloss Michael and Talbot Strobe, At the Highest Levels ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1993).

Hogan Michael, editor, The End of the Cold War ( New York: Cambridge University Press, 1992).


Document 70
The New World Order

President Bush responded to Iraq's invasion of Kuwait by organizing an international coalition that successfully liberated the victim of aggression. On 6 March 1991 the president told Congress, "We can see a new world coming into view. A world in which there is the very real prospect of a new world order."70

Speaker Foley. Mr. President, it is customary at joint sessions for the Chair to present the President to the Members of Congress directly and without further comment. But I wish to depart from tradition tonight and express to you on behalf of the Congress and the country, and through you to the members of our Armed Forces, our warmest congratulations on the brilliant victory of the Desert Storm Operation.

____________________
70
Public Papers of the Presidents: Administration of George Bush, 1991 ( Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1992), 1:218-22.

-180-

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