Financing Information Services: Problems, Changing Approaches, and New Opportunities for Academic and Research Libraries

By Peter Spyers-Duran; Thomas W. Mann Jr. | Go to book overview

8
Total Resource Budget Planning for Academic Libraries

Sherman Hayes

Every generation of librarians is tempted to cry out against all of the new fiscal pressures on libraries. A reading of the historical literature seems to indicate that every generation has faced the same types of resource shortages and demands for new resources. This model of total resource budgeting recognizes that the source of the resource impacts significantly on the level and use of such resources.

In any given institutional budget process there are a number of budget projections being made simultaneously. The traditional operating budget request is produced using whatever criteria are demanded by the parent institution and it may be produced from the grass roots up or at the administrative level. The library administration, either systematically or casually, is meanwhile projecting a total resources budget. What limitations and directions of effort are dictated by the type of resources available? If the potential operating budget does not cover all of the needs, what other resources are available or need to be made available?

Much of this basic overview is common knowledge. This chapter is constructed using the following organization: statement of definitions and basic model; in-depth comments on resources and trends in each specific budget area; and implications in summary.

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