The Politics of Nonformal Education in Latin America

By Carlos Alberto Torres | Go to book overview

processes of popular struggle are introduced into the state arena. Hence education appears linked to the growth of the critical consciousness of individuals, along with growing expectations for occupying better positions in the labor market or succeeding in advancing the substantive democratization of the political and economic areas of our societies.


CONCLUSION: QUESTIONS FOR COMPARATIVE RESEARCH

An important topic for comparative research is the study of the historical crystallization of this dual character of education and its expression at the level of educational policy. Here are some of the questions that appear to be important for such a program: (1) How are class, ideologies, the general objectives of the state, and the concrete formulation of educational policy linked? (2) What are the principal institutional, educational, organizational, and administrative means utilized by educational bureaucracies for molding educational practices to the prescriptions emanating from the ethical state, despite the centrifugal tendencies daily verified in educational practices? (3) Is it certain that education constitutes a mechanism for the elaboration of a collective consensus with respect to the dominant hegemonic culture? If so, how do children and youth react to the working and campesino classes? (4) How profoundly can an ideology sink into the consciousness of citizens submitted to the systematic exercise of educational socialization? Even more important, how are the modes of reception of this ideology established in the student-teacher relationship, the formation and distribution of gender roles, and behavioral expectations in the classroom? (5) If there exists a dynamic of ideological confrontation, and thus every ideological phenomenon does not consist simply in passive reception by agents but is an active process of acceptance and rejection, how is the dominant ideology resisted, rejected, and even redefined within schools by educational actors: administrators, teachers, students, family heads?

Once again it appears that the response to all of these questions can arise only from the concrete analysis of concrete situations. It appears opportune to continue rethinking theoretically and investigating empirically the principles of power and organization that underlie the capitalist states in Latin America, and to investigate above all how these principles are reformulated in the production of educational policy and what are the mechanisms of reception of such policies by the popular sectors.


NOTES
1.
The characterization of the state in Gramsci has been the object of many polemics and contradictory opinions ( Cerroni, 1973: 151-58; Portantiero, 1981: 221-28; Anderson, 1978: 45-47, 59ff.). According to Anderson, Gramsci oscillates between two major definitions of the state. In the first, an opposition is established between the state

-31-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Politics of Nonformal Education in Latin America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.