Comparative Constitutional Federalism: Europe and America

By Mark Tushnet | Go to book overview

3
Preservation of Cultural Diversity in a Federal System: The Role of the Regions

GIANDOMENICO MAJONE


INTRODUCTION

A striking feature of contemporary Europe is the parallel movement toward greater political and economic integration on the one hand, and toward regional decentralization on the other. The successive enlargements of the European Community (EC), the renewed drive toward completion of the internal market by 1992, and the continuous expansion of Community regulation in all domains of economic and social life are clear signs that essential functions of modern government can no longer be carried out effectively in a purely national context. At the time, the strength of the regionalist movement proves that if the European nation-state is too small for certain functions, it is also too large to carry out other functions.

What has to be explained is how the same process that pushes toward economic and political integration also produces regional consciousness and a growing desire for identification and membership in a community more distinct and culturally homogeneous than national society. This process is not peculiar to Europe but it may find here its most advanced expression.

The reemergence of ethnic and cultural regionalism in many parts of the world has been explained (for example, by the American sociologist S. M. Lipset) as a form of resistance to modernizing trends in postindustrial society. This is certainly not true in the case of Europe. Here the current fascination with cultural distinctiveness is not due to a rejection of the imperatives of modernity but to the enormous increase in the intensity of exchange among European countries that forces each European to better understand his or her cultural roots in order

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Comparative Constitutional Federalism: Europe and America
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions In Legal Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword: Toward a National Identity in the European Economic Community vii
  • Notes x
  • Preface xi
  • 1: The First Phases of American Federalism 1
  • Notes 16
  • 2: Economic Integration and Interregional Migration in the United States Federal System 21
  • Notes 50
  • 3: Preservation of Cultural Diversity in a Federal System: The Role of the Regions 67
  • 3: Preservation of Cultural Diversity in a Federal System 67
  • Notes 75
  • 4: Putting Up and Putting Down: Tolerance Reconsidered 77
  • Notes 105
  • 5: Protecting Human Rights in a Federal System 115
  • Notes 133
  • 6: Conclusion 139
  • Notes 150
  • Bibliographical Essay 153
  • References 159
  • Index 163
  • About the Editor and Contributors 167
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