The Rainbow Division in the Great War, 1917-1919

By James J. Cooke | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
The information about the tactical array of the Rainbow Division in the Baccarat sector is taken from Henry J. Reilly, Americans All: The Rainbow at War ( Columbus, Ohio: F.J. Heer Printing Co., 1936), 189-91, and map following p. 228.
2.
Francis P. Duffy, Father Duffy's Story ( New York: George H. Doran Co., 1919), 81-83.
3.
New York Times, 27 April 1919. Walter B. Wolf, Brief Story of the Rainbow Division ( New York: Rand McNally Co., 1919), 14.
4.
Hugh S. Thompson, "Following the Rainbow," The Chattanooga Times 18 February 1934.
5.
Statement by Corporal A. M. Simpson, formerly of Company A, 168th Infantry, undated, in Military History Institute WWI Questionnaires, Military History Institute Archives (hereinafter MHIA).
6.
Lawrence Stewart, Rainbow Bright ( Philadelphia: Dorrance, 1923), 49-50.
8.
A. Churchill Ettinger (ed.), A Doughboy with the Fighting 69th (Shippensburg, PA: White Main Publishing, 1992), 85-87.
10.
Telegram from Colonel Fox Connor to YMCA headquarters, Paris, 12 February 1918, in the National Archives, Washington, Records Group 120 Records of the AEP, 42nd Division, carton I (hereinafter, RG 120).
11.
An avalanche of complaints reached the United States via soldier's letters, and there was great criticism of the YMCA at home. To counter this flood of bitterness, YMCA workers rose to defend the organization. In 1920 Katherine Mayo published That Damned Y ( New York: Houghton-Mifflin), which was a syrupy defense of the YMCA. Regardless of the defenders, the YMCA's reputation suffered. Interestingly enough, when one reads the CMH's questionnaires completed by doughboys in the 1980s, the harsh criticism of the YMCA continued, well after fifty years. Not every doughboy complained about the YMCA. Kansan Sergeant Calvin Lambert, while in the hospital, was well treated by the local YMCA representative when he was out of money and needed things the YMCA was selling. "The boys knock the Y but I have nothing but admiration and gratitude for the organization," he wrote. Calvin Lambert Diary (entry for 15 April 1918), manuscript, Emporia Public Library, Emporia, Kansas, 128.
12.
Charles MacArthur, War Bugs ( Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, Doran and Co., 1929), 60-62.
13.
John B. Hayes, Heroes Among the Brave (Loachapoka, Ala.: Lee County Historical Society, 1973), 34.
14.
Donovan to his wife, np, 28 March 1918, in the Donovan Papers, MHIA.
15.
Donovan to his wife, 13 May 1918, ibid.
16.
Van Dolsen to his aunt, np, 19 February 1919, in U.S. Army Military History Institute Archives, Carlisle Barracks, Pennsylvania, 42nd Division AEF Collection, MHIA.
17.
Notes provided by Joseph O. Romano, Jr., Birmingham, Alabama, based on his conversations with his father, Corporal Joseph O. Romano, 167th Infantry (hereinafter, Romano Notes).
18.
Walter B. Wolf, Brief History of the Rainbow Division ( New York: Rand

-94-

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The Rainbow Division in the Great War, 1917-1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • INTRODUCTION BIRTH OF THE RAINBOW 1
  • 1 - From Camp Mills to France 7
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Training for the Fight: Rolampont 29
  • Notes 48
  • 3 - In the Trenches at Lunéville 53
  • Notes 71
  • 4 - From Baccarat to Champagne 75
  • Notes 94
  • From Champagne to the Marne 97
  • Notes 113
  • 6 - Crossing the Ourcq River 117
  • Notes 135
  • 7 - The St. Mihiel Offensive 139
  • Notes 159
  • 8 - The Meuse-Argonne Campaign 163
  • Notes 182
  • 9 - From Sedan to Belgium and Luxembourg 187
  • Notes 205
  • 10 - Rainbow on the Rhine 209
  • Notes 228
  • 11 - The End of the Rainbow 233
  • Notes 245
  • APPENDIX A ORGANIZATION OF THE 42ND DIVISION, 1917 247
  • APPENDIX B EQUIPMENT TAKEN INTO TRENCHES, FEBRUARY 1918 251
  • Bibliography 253
  • Index 261
  • About the Author 272
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