Systematic Analysis in Dispute Resolution

By Stuart S. Nagel; Miriam K. Mills | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 9
The Use of Simulation in International Negotiations

GILBERT R. WINHAM

Since 1973, the author has employed simulation exercises for the purpose of training government officers in negotiation techniques. These exercises have been held in Ottawa, Washington, D.C., Geneva (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade), and in various locations in developing countries. The exercises have generally lasted two to three days, with participants taking roles and attempting to reach a negotiated settlement within the boundaries established by the simulation scenario. The negotiation situations established by these simulation exercises include the following: multilateral trade (tariff) negotiation; negotiation between an "authority" established by the Convention on the Law of the Sea and a consortium of mining companies; negotiation between a small developing country and two foreign multinational corporations; and a bilateral negotiation between two nations over six issues. (The simulation exercises are described briefly in the appendix.)

The simulation exercises portray realistic examples of international negotiation, which is necessary to retain the attention of professional participants. Realism also makes the exercises useful for theoretical analysis of negotiation processes. The simulation exercises portray concrete situations, and demonstrate the capacity of substantive material to shape negotiation behavior. The exercises also represent institutional factors, which are an important and largely forgotten issue in negotiation theory. In international negotiations it is relatively uncommon for the interaction to be limited to single individuals, and the Vietnam peace negotiations between Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho, or the Camp David negotiations involving President Jimmy Carter, President Anwar Sadat, and Prime Minister Menachen Begin are exceptions that prove the rule. Usually institutional factors

-143-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Systematic Analysis in Dispute Resolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.