Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

By Philip Gaunt | Go to book overview

Preface

This book has grown out of a previous book of mine, Choosing the News, a comparative study of factors influencing the way in which journalists select and process information in different countries. One of the most influential factors is training. Not all press systems are the same, and journalism training varies considerably from one system to another. As the reflection of journalism, training is shaped by the social, cultural, economic and political conditions in which it is conducted. It is affected by press laws, government controls, ownership, competition and, above all, the perceived function of journalism in any given society.

As a study of training needs, programs and facilities in 70 countries, Making the Newsmakers is the first worldwide survey of its kind since 1958. As an up-to-date directory of almost 600 training establishments in every region of the world, it is also a work of reference. Collecting, processing and analyzing the data needed for this study has been a tremendous task that would have been impossible without the generous cooperation and able assistance of a large number of people and institutions.

First and foremost, I want to thank UNESCO for sponsoring the research required to complete the study. In particular, I wish to acknowledge the friendly assistance and enlightened advice of Morten Giersing, Chief of UNESCO's Section of Free Flow of Information and Communication Research, and Alan Hancock, Director of the Division of Communication.

-xi-

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Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • Chapter Two - Training Needs 11
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter Three - Training Structures 21
  • Chapter Four - the United States and Canada 29
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter Five - Western Europe 41
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter Six - Eastern and Central Europe 79
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter Seven - Asia and the Pacific 89
  • Notes 120
  • Chapter Eight Latin America and the Caribbean 123
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter Nine Africa 135
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Ten North Africa and the Middle East 151
  • Notes 156
  • Chapter Eleven Challenges and Prospects 157
  • Appendix - Directory of Training Institutions 163
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 235
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