Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training

By Philip Gaunt | Go to book overview

either for those whose skills may have deteriorated over time or for those who are being called upon to work with new equipment or procedures. The fifth level seeks to build a liberal background so that communicators can develop an ability to process a variety of information and understand social, cultural and economic issues affecting their audience. The final level extends to specialized applications in the various fields of mass communication.

The quantitative side of needs assessment is affected by a variety of social and professional factors. The numbers and types of communicators needed by the media industry of a society will depend on the structure of that industry. For example, is the media system dominated by the print media, or is broadcasting an important avenue of communication? In most industrialized nations, there is a fairly balanced mix of media, controlled to a certain extent by the degree of advertising allowed in the broadcast media. In other countries, there may be technical difficulties associated with the availability of newsprint or printing presses, or social problems such as illiteracy, which are bound to alter prevailing media structures. In some countries, geographic considerations may make it difficult to distribute newspapers or transmit broadcast messages effectively. In a few societies, media consumption patterns may be shaped by strong cultural or religious traditions.

In summary, then, the training needs of different societies will be affected by any number of factors associated with their political and social systems, their economies and their media systems, as well as the traditions and perceived roles of the communicators that work in them. It is obvious that such training needs will vary considerably and that very different training structures will be needed to meet them successfully.


NOTES
1.
UNESCO, The Training of Journalists: A World-wide Study on the Training of Personnel for the Mass Media ( Paris: UNESCO, 1958); UNESCO, Education for Journalism, Reports and Papers on Mass Communication, no.8 ( Paris: UNESCO, 1954).
2.
UNESCO, Training for Mass Communication, Reports and Papers on Mass Communication, no.73 ( Paris: UNESCO, 1975); May Katzen, Mass Communication: Teaching and Studies at Universities ( Paris: UNESCO Press, 1975).
3.
For example, "International Meeting of Experts on Regional Approaches to Communication Training," UNESCO House, Paris, June 12-14, 1991.
4.
UNESCO, Training for Mass Communication, p. 9.

-19-

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Making the Newsmakers: International Handbook on Journalism Training
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Notes 8
  • Chapter Two - Training Needs 11
  • Notes 19
  • Chapter Three - Training Structures 21
  • Chapter Four - the United States and Canada 29
  • Notes 38
  • Chapter Five - Western Europe 41
  • Notes 75
  • Chapter Six - Eastern and Central Europe 79
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter Seven - Asia and the Pacific 89
  • Notes 120
  • Chapter Eight Latin America and the Caribbean 123
  • Notes 134
  • Chapter Nine Africa 135
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Ten North Africa and the Middle East 151
  • Notes 156
  • Chapter Eleven Challenges and Prospects 157
  • Appendix - Directory of Training Institutions 163
  • Selected Bibliography 215
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 235
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