Public Relations Inquiry as Rhetorical Criticism: Case Studies of Corporate Discourse and Social Influence

By William N. Elwood | Go to book overview

1
Public Relations Is a Rhetorical Experience The Integral Principle in Case Study Analysis

William N. Elwood

People do not experience organizations; I they experience the communication organizations issue and the communication about organizations. This statement may seem self-evident. We have become accustomed to corporate entities "speaking" in the public realm. Mobil often voices its opinions in the opening pages of Time magazine. Newsletters frequently contain stories or statements that have no by- line; thus, we assume the institution is speaking. We also are familiar with references to organizations' rhetoric, to news reports that begin, "IBM announced today" or "Sears said that it was selling its Discover card division and would concentrate on its retail core," as if IBM or Sears could speak and write for themselves. As public relations writing books inform present and future PR practitioners, "Public relations is, after all, communication, and the basic form of communication is still the written word" ( Bivins, 1991, p. 1; see also Newsom and Carrell, 1991; Tucker et al., 1994).

Perhaps because organizational discourse has become commonplace, books often examine public relations case studies in abstract terms, recounting that certain organizations communicate to particular publics to achieve certain objectives. Such recountals often follow with assessments of relative effectiveness. While certainly informative and pedagogical, these campaign descriptions do not provide readers with samples of this communication, nor do they inform readers as to how a campaign's communication influenced anyone. Public opinion polls

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public Relations Inquiry as Rhetorical Criticism: Case Studies of Corporate Discourse and Social Influence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.