Victims of Soviet Terror: The Story of the Memorial Movement

By Nanci Adler | Go to book overview

PART I
MEMORIAL: HISTORY AS MORAL IMPERATIVE

In this section, we will traverse the seventy-year cycle from the birth and triumph of the Bolshevik Party under Lenin to its exposure to glasnost and disintegration under Gorbachev. In between there was the reign of Stalin, and throughout there was the phenomenon that came to be called Stalinism. "Terror" and "repression" were the shaping instruments of this period. Part I will explore their form and scope, the efforts from above to oppose them (official "de-Stalinization"), and one of the major efforts at de-Stalinization from below-- Memorial's retrospective on Soviet history. As the rulers realized all too well, historical scholarship is always political. The hegemonic issues are what will be selected for remembrance and how it will be interpreted. While Memorial was exposing the past, it was also discrediting the present. Indeed, it was partly through publicizing the perfidy of that past that the ruling clique was unseated.

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Victims of Soviet Terror: The Story of the Memorial Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Notes xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction 1
  • PART I - MEMORIAL: HISTORY AS MORAL IMPERATIVE 7
  • CHAPTER 1 - The Formation of the Soviet System 9
  • CHAPTER 2 - Stalinism: Inheritance and Legacy 31
  • CHAPTER 3 - The Rediscovery of Soviet History 41
  • PART II - THE EMERGENCE AND EVOLUTION OF MEMORIAL 49
  • CHAPTER 4 - 1987-1988: Gaining Support 51
  • CHAPTER 5 - 1988-1989: Toward the Founding Conference 69
  • CHAPTER 6 - 1989-1990: Memorial Branches Out 83
  • PART III - MEMORIAL ACTUALIZES ITSELF, HISTORY AS DISSIDENCE 103
  • CHAPTER 7 - Memorial in Action 105
  • CHAPTER 8 - The Politics of Memorial 123
  • Epilogue - "Today We Are Historians of Dissidence, and Not Dissidents" 133
  • Notes 138
  • Appendix A 139
  • Appendix B 141
  • Selected Bibliography 151
  • Index 153
  • About the Author 157
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