The Origins of Violence in Mexican Society

By Christina Jacqueline Johns | Go to book overview

Preface

The root of all violence is institutional violence. Oscar Arnulfo Romero, former archbishop of San Salvador Assassinated by the Salvadoran military while saying Mass, 24 March 1980

It is often helpful for researchers to explain how they came to look at specific problems and especially how they came to adopt a particular theoretical approach to the problems they study. When I began exploring violence in Mexico, my interest was not in state violence or the violence of the sixteenth century, but in contemporary criminal violence in Mexico. Even though Mexico has one of the highest rates of violent crime in the world, most criminological studies of violence have focused on North America, Britain, and Scandinavia. Any meaningful analysis of societal violence, however, has to extend beyond the bounds of advanced industrialized countries and include the study of violence in other less developed countries. The extraordinarily high rate of criminal violence in Mexico as reported in United Nations crime statistics indicated that Mexico was a good place to start. So I went to Mexico.

I spent a year traveling from Nuevo Laredo on the Texas border, to Mexico City, through central Mexico to Chiapas, to Yucatan and down into Guatemala. I visited prisons and jails; talked to judges, prisoners, newspaper reporters, governmental officials, and policemen; and spent untold hours looking at page after page of regional and national criminal statistics. Very quickly, however, I found myself confronted with the same kinds of method-

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Origins of Violence in Mexican Society
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 2 - The Rise of the Aztec State 17
  • Notes 30
  • 3 - The Aztec Social Formation in the Later Empire 31
  • 4 - Warfare in Aztec Mexico 51
  • SUMMARY 65
  • 5 - Forced Labor in Aztec Mexico 67
  • SUMMARY 80
  • 6 - Legal Sanctions in Aztec Mexico 81
  • SUMMARY 91
  • 7 - Aztec Human Sacrifice and the Politics of Fear 93
  • SUMMARY 107
  • 8 - Spain and the World Economy 109
  • 9 - Warfare in the Age of the Conquistador 133
  • SUMMARY 158
  • 10 - Forced Labor in Conquest Mexico 161
  • 11 - Legal Sanctions in Conquest Mexico 185
  • SUMMARY 197
  • 12 - Violence and the Colonial Heritage in Mexico 199
  • SUMMARY 210
  • References 211
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.