Naturalistic Inquiry for Library Science: Methods and Applications for Research, Evaluation, and Teaching

By Constance Ann Mellon | Go to book overview

Regardless of the naturalistic technique applied or adapted for the purpose of evaluation, all share the same perspective--understanding a phenomenon as participants in the phenomenon understand it. This understanding often differs radically from what the designer of a program or service intended. Focusing on what happens to real people in real settings as plans are implemented can provide valuable information for decision making, information that might otherwise go unnoticed.


NOTES
1.
For a comprehensive overview of this topic, see Bogdan and Biklen, Qualitative Research for Education, pp. 195-207.
2.
Robert L. Stake, Evaluating the Arts in Education ( Columbus, Ohio: Charles E. Merrill, 1975).
3.
Michael Scriven, "Goal-free Evaluation." In E. House (Ed.), School Evaluation ( Berkeley, Calif.: McCutchan, 1973).
4.
Malcolm Parlett and Garry Dearden (Eds.), Introduction to Illuminative Evaluation: Studies in Higher Education ( Cardiff-by-the-Sea, Calif.: Pacific Press, 1977), pp. 1-7.
5.
Eugene J. Webb, Donald T. Campbell, Richard D. Schwartz, and Lee Sechrest , Unobtrusive Measures: Nonreactive Research in the Social Sciences ( Chicago: Rand McNally, 1966).
6.
Egon G. Guba, Toward a Methodology of Naturalistic Inquiry in Educational Evaluation ( Los Angeles: University of California, Center for Study of Evaluation, 1978); Egon G. Guba, "Criteria for Assessing the Trustworthiness of Naturalistic Inquiries," Educational Communications and Technology Journal 29 (Summer, 1981), pp. 75-91; Egon G. Guba and Yvonna S. Lincoln, "Epistemological and Methodological Bases of Naturalistic Inquiry," Educational Communications and Technology Journal 30 (Winter 1982), pp. 233-52; Yvonna S. Lincoln and Egon G. Guba , Naturalistic Inquiry ( Beverly Hills, Calif.: Sage, 1985).
7.
James R. Sanders and Donald J. Cunningham, "Formative Evaluation: Selecting Techniques and Procedures." In G. Borich (Ed.), Evaluating Educational Programs and Products ( Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Educational Technology Publications, 1974).
9.
Tobias, Overcoming Math Anxiety.
10.
Constance A. Mellon and Edmund Sass, "Perry and Piaget: Theoretical Framework for Effective Course Development," Educational Technology 21 ( May 1981), pp. 29-33.
11.
Theodore A. Chandler, "The Questionable Status of Student Evaluations of Teaching," Teaching of Psychology 5 ( October 1978), pp. 150-52; Benjy Levin, "Teacher Evaluation--A Review of Research," Educational Leadership 37 ( December 1979), pp. 240-45; Arie Rotem and Naftaly S. Glassman, "On the Effectiveness of Students' Evaluative Feedback to University Professors," Review of Educational Research 49 (Summer 1979), pp. 497-511.
12.
Mark Redmond and D. Joseph Clark, "Small Group Instructional Diagnosis: A Practical Approach to Improving Teaching,"

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Naturalistic Inquiry for Library Science: Methods and Applications for Research, Evaluation, and Teaching
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Librarianship and Information Science ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Copyrightt Acknowledgments v
  • Contents ix
  • Figures xi
  • Foreword xiii
  • Preface xv
  • 1 - The Theory Underlying Naturalistic Inquiry 1
  • Notes 20
  • 2 - Selecting, Defining, and Limiting Your Study 23
  • Notes 37
  • 3 - Collecting and Analyzing Naturalistic Data: An Integrated Activity 39
  • Notes 67
  • 4 - Intensive Analysis for Theory Generation 69
  • Notes 94
  • 5 - Presenting Your Findings 97
  • Prologue: Guidelines for Naturalistic Reporting 100
  • References 123
  • Epilogue: Contrasting the Two Reports 124
  • EPILOGUE: CONTRASTING THE TWO REPORTS 128
  • 6 - Naturalistic Inquiry for Research in Library Science 131
  • Notes 144
  • 7 - Naturalistic Inquiry for Evaluation in Library Science 147
  • Notes 166
  • 8 - Naturalistic Inquiry as a Teaching Method in Library Science 169
  • Selected Bibliography 191
  • Index 199
  • About the Author 203
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