Emerging Powers: Defense and Security in the Third World

By Rodney W. Jones; Steven A. Hildreth | Go to book overview

12
Emerging Powers: Defense and Security

Rodneg W. Jones and Steven A. Hildreth

Reflecting naturally the great variety of Third World conditions, the emerging powers in our sample are markedly different from one another. They are at widely different stages in their own development. Security and threat conditions vary considerably, as do the defense capabilities that the regional powers have at their disposal. Some have waged or encountered major wars in the postwar era, and others have not. Some have experienced radical societal changes and deep economic upheavals or become exponents of a revolutionary political tradition, while others have developed along a more moderate or orderly course. Some are internationalist in their outlook, and others are drawn intensely inward. Some are endowed with rich natural resources, while others are destined to be resource poor. And some are run by authoritarian governments, while others range from pluralistic to democratic. In most but not every case, the military serves a political and social role, in addition to that of national defense.

But amidst the striking differences, there are certain patterns and resemblances that emerge in their military situations and behavior, if not uniformly, still as typical of several at a time. All of them possess attributes of power, capability, and interest that suggest they will play key roles in shaping the international security affairs of their respective regions in the years ahead, and that is why they merit our attention. This chapter reflects on the patterns that are evident among the case studies in terms of emerging aspirations, local threat

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