Falcon's Cry: A Desert Storm Memoir

By Denise Donnelly; Michael Donnelly | Go to book overview

Epilogue

The Gulf War changed forever the nature of warfare. By establishing early air superiority, and by relying on a vast and sophisticated system of satellites in outer space, the United States was able to bring the war to the enemy before the enemy ever had a chance to launch an offensive. It was a war for the information age, in which information truly became a weapon. To this day, the Pentagon continues to flaunt its successes, calling it the first-ever clinically perfect war. Trouble is, today the clinics are full of that war's casualties, and many of them are without health insurance, destitute, unable to work and waiting to die.

But it was not just the nature of warfare that changed during Desert Storm. The nature of casualties and fatalities also changed. This was a war where information was not the only invisible weapon. Time will eventually reveal the truth, as it did decades after the Pentagon denied that Agent Orange caused cancer, birth defects and early deaths for thousands of Vietnam vets and their families.

We are the victims of a perversely modern form of friendly fire. Many of us have been poisoned, perhaps all of us, and some of that poison was allegedly manufactured in that most American of states, Texas.

Just as the war relied upon the wizardry of computers, so has our battle for the truth. Thousands of us converse daily on the Internet, through Gulf War veterans' mailing lists, on webpages of our own design. We tell one another our stories, we locate the comfort of truth and camaraderie in this most democratic of media. Daily we thwart the efforts of the world's most powerful, wealthiest aggressor with the click of a mouse.

The long-term effects of the perfect war, a war that lasted only 36 days, are yet to be tallied, and the fatalities and casualties continue to mount. While the Pentagon has ensured that you will not see us dying in your living room every night, every sick Gulf War veteran has a story to tell, a story that may never be known to the millions of Americans who supported the men and women who fought that neat but deadly war.

We salute these courageous men and women, heroes all, so that their suffering may not go unacknowledged, their sacrifice not have been in vain.

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Falcon's Cry: A Desert Storm Memoir
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Preface ix
  • Part I Air Warrior 1
  • Needle, Ball and Air Speed 3
  • Part II The Widening Gyre 13
  • The Apple Wars 15
  • Wild Blue Yonder 23
  • Velocity and Vector 39
  • Part III Victory Takes Wings 53
  • Lines in the Sand 55
  • Peaceday, Warday 67
  • Crossing the Fence 81
  • Crud 101
  • How Do You Spell Victory? 111
  • Part IV The Wings of Icarus 123
  • No Joy 127
  • Solo 137
  • Bogeys 147
  • Near Miss 156
  • Lost Wingman 170
  • Homecoming 184
  • A Full 360 204
  • Bandits, Twelve O'Clock 220
  • Part V Fallen Angels 231
  • Nordo 235
  • Epilogue 243
  • A Fighter Pilot's Glossary of Terms 245
  • Congressional Report-- House of Representatives 249
  • About the Authors 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 256

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.