Marx and the Postmodernism Debates: An Agenda for Critical Theory

By Lorraine Y. Landry | Go to book overview

Chapter 3
Derrida

If poststructuralism can be seen as the result of the encounter of Nietzsche, Heidegger and Saussure," 1 then the epithet applies to Derrida as he engages aspects of the work of all three thinkers in his own criticisms of modernity. From Nietzsche, Derrida accepts the aestheticization of language, the view of the world as a work of art, and the imperative for human self-creation. These themes are developed within a critique of Heidegger's metaphysics of Being, which Derrida attempts to surpass. His view of language involves the radicalization of Saussure's theory of the sign, which Derrida also exploits to challenge Husserlian themes of presence in language.

Derrida's thought is, in part, contextualized by Nietzschean themes, which generally include the following: (1) the individual subject is not the unitary, self-making agent of bourgeois society, but, rather, historically constituted by and subject to unconscious drives; (2) the character of reality is permeated by the "will to power" which moves through nature and human beings in cycles of struggle and domination, and such dynamics are constitutive of reality and subjective identities; and (3) both human history and human thought express this "will to power," this will to domination, so that the only epistemological stance adequate to it is a perspectivism which makes no claim to correspondence with a reality divorced from the "will to power." 2

Habermas notes these influences of Nietzsche on the reception of modernity primarily as a precursor of modernism where "he is the first

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Marx and the Postmodernism Debates: An Agenda for Critical Theory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Notes xiii
  • Chapter 1 the Project of Modernity 1
  • Notes 23
  • Chapter 3 Derrida 45
  • Notes 58
  • Chapter 4 Foucault 67
  • Notes 76
  • Notes 95
  • Chapter 6 a Fruitful Tension Approach 105
  • Notes 126
  • Chapter 7 Marx and the Postmodernism Debates 141
  • Notes 156
  • Chapter 8 an Agenda for Critical Theory 169
  • Notes 191
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 227
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.