Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas

By L. Glenn Smith; Joan K. Smith | Go to book overview

practices, they also provided the conditions for the discovery of new knowledge. Such basic matters as accents in language and the system of musical notation were invented in monasteries.

Far from being a period of "darkness," the medieval period (from about 500 to 1500) was a time of educational and intellectual ferment. Charlemagne's effort to spread education without regard to students' social background is still a goal of most governments and is certainly a centerpiece of American educational effort. Aquinas's reconciliation of faith with scientific investigation remains not only a brilliant solution to a serious problem but also a practical source of rapprochement for two major and contradictory intellectual thrusts in the Western world.

Not the least of the medieval period's contributions to education was the university. Such terms as chancellor, dean, college, faculty, and university are Roman labels that traveled a long way toward acquiring their modern meanings under the monastics. The medieval university was more than an extension of classical studies and Roman labels; it was a new structure. For good or ill the central educational symbol of modern society, the university--including the central concept of licensing and professionalizing knowledge--had its birth in monastic Europe. The Renaissance and Reformation, discussed in the next two chapters, elaborated and further developed what medieval Europeans had saved and invented.


NOTES
1.
David Knowles, Christian Monasticism ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1969), 12.
2.
Knowles, Christian Monasticism, 13. Spelling Americanized.
3.
Quoted in Bertrand Russell, A History of Western Philosophy and Its Connection with Political and Social Circumstances from the Earliest Times to the Present Day ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1956), 379.
4.
Augusta Theodosia Drane, Christian Schools and Scholars--Or Sketches of Education from the Christian Era to the Council of Trent, ed. Walter Gumbley ( London: Burns, Oates, and Washbourne, 1924), 168-69.
5.
Anthony C. Meisel and M. L. del Mastro, trans., The Rule of St. Benedict ( Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1975), 10.
6.
Meisel and del Mastro, The Rule of St. Benedict, 9.
7.
Drane, Christian Schools and Scholars, 292.
8.
Piero Weiss and Richard Tarkuskin, eds., Music in the Western World: A History in Documents ( New York: Schirmer Books, 1984), 53.
9.
Drane, Christian Schools and Scholars, 292.
10.
Weiss and Tarkuskin, Music in the Western World, 54.
11.
Drane, Christian Schools and Scholars, 124; Pierre Riché, Daily Life in the World of Charlemagne, trans. JoAnn McNamara ( Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1978), 225.
12.
The eastern half of Charlemagne's empire was proclaimed the Holy Roman Empire in 962, and this grandiose title supposedly represented a culmination of Charlemagne's efforts.

-91-

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Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Greeks 5
  • Notes 31
  • Chapter Two - The Romance 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter Three - The Monastics 57
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter Four - The Humanists 94
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Five - The Reformers 123
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Six - The New Educators 151
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter Seven - The Americans 198
  • Notes 235
  • Chapter Eight - The Friends of Education 239
  • Chapter Nine - The Progressives 273
  • Notes 310
  • Chapter Ten - The Outsiders 312
  • Notes 351
  • Chapter Eleven - The Critics 355
  • Notes 407
  • Chapter Twelve - The Paradigm Shifters 412
  • Notes 439
  • Epilogue 443
  • Notes 445
  • Contributors 447
  • Index 449
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