Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas

By L. Glenn Smith; Joan K. Smith | Go to book overview

gymnasium, academy, and lyceum, came to be applied to centers of classical study.

The Renaissance is also important because it spawned the women's movement in education. It was not because humanists like Erasmus advocated restricted education of women that we identify a new impetus for women's education. Rather, it was the courageous and literate challenge of Christine de Pisan for gender equality in education and life that marked the Renaissance as a time of change in the history of education for women.

Finally, it is important to remember that the humanities included study of all aspects of human beings: beautiful and ugly, triumphant and pathetic, generous and mean. Although humanists like Vittorino da Feltre embodied humane gentleness, the hard-headed realism of Niccolò Machiavelli was also part of the humanist tradition. The Reformation would keep the classical and vernacular thrusts of the Renaissance while reclaiming the earlier religious purpose of education.


NOTES
1.
Cf. Denys Hays, The Italian Renaissance in Its Historical Background ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1961), 1; Baron Hans, The Crisis of the Early Italian Renaissance: Civic Humanism and Republican Liberty in the Age of Classicism and Tyranny ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1966), xxvii-xxviii.
2.
R. R. Bolgar, The Classical Heritage and Its Beneficiaries ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1963), 255.
3.
William H. Woodward, Vittorino da Feltre and Other Humanist Educators: Essays and Versions ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1921), 2.
4.
James Bowen, A History of Western Education, 3 vols. ( New York: St. Martin's Press, 1975), 2: 225.
5.
Woodward, Vittorino da Feltre, 16-17.
6.
The information on Renaissance classroom practice comes from an unpublished paper by Anthony Grafton of Princeton University, "How the Humanists Learned Greek: A Study in Classroom Practice," presented at the Newberry Library Renaissance Conference, April 23, 1982.
7.
Hays, The Italian Renaissance, 154.
8.
Enid McLeod, The Order of the Rose: The Life and Ideas of Christine de Pizan ( London: Chatto & Windus, 1976). All biographical details are from this source.
9.
For an expanded discussion, see L. Glenn Smith, "From Plato to Jung: Centuries of Inequalities," Educational Horizons 60 (Fall 1981): 4-10.
10.
Phyllis Stock, Better than Rubies: A History of Women's Education ( New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1978), 42.
11.
McLeod, The Order of the Rose, 48.
12.
McLeod, The Order of the Rose, 66.
13.
McLeod, The Order of the Rose, 70.
14.
McLeod, The Order of the Rose, 160.
15.
See Clive Wood and Beryl Suitters, The Fight for Acceptance: A History of Contraception ( Aylesbury, UK: Medical and Technical Publishing, 1970).

-121-

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Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Greeks 5
  • Notes 31
  • Chapter Two - The Romance 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter Three - The Monastics 57
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter Four - The Humanists 94
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Five - The Reformers 123
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Six - The New Educators 151
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter Seven - The Americans 198
  • Notes 235
  • Chapter Eight - The Friends of Education 239
  • Chapter Nine - The Progressives 273
  • Notes 310
  • Chapter Ten - The Outsiders 312
  • Notes 351
  • Chapter Eleven - The Critics 355
  • Notes 407
  • Chapter Twelve - The Paradigm Shifters 412
  • Notes 439
  • Epilogue 443
  • Notes 445
  • Contributors 447
  • Index 449
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