Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas

By L. Glenn Smith; Joan K. Smith | Go to book overview

An unselfish, self-sacrificing person, he left his beautiful island of paradise, Hawaii, to come to Poston in the hope that he might help us, lead us, encourage us, in building a school of which we might be truly proud.

And so today because of his overflowing kindness as well as because of his guidance, we have an oasis of good fellowship which will live in our hearts forever.


SUMMARY

There have been many critics of education: we have discussed only a few. Each added to the emerging knowledge base of educational theory and practice, and each had at least a partial antidote to the ills of large, urban, bureaucratized systems of education.

Maria Montessori understood the value of removing the teacher from the place of central focus to allow greater autonomy for children as self-directing learners. Margaret Naumburg understood that teachers can unconsciously project their own unresolved inner struggles into their classrooms, that group pressure can hinder individual development, and that overemphasis on intellectual and vocational skills can abridge emotional growth. John B. Watson joined Montessori in stressing the need for schools to pay careful attention to the learning environment. Jacques Maritain offered a corrective for the overemphasis on positivistic sciences prevalent in twentieth-century mainstream schooling. He also reminded educators that education has a spiritual dimension often ignored in schools. W. E. B. DuBois brought the racism in American society into plain view and challenged all Americans-- and especially those of African descent--to find solutions. George S. Counts reminded everyone that schooling is not neutral and that it can either make social problems worse or help solve them. Miles Cary saw the need for multicultural tolerance and cultural pluralism.

Many other critics could be cited. Education in most countries, including the United States, has come under scrutiny in recent years. Issues of gender, social class, and ethnic equity are worldwide. Curricular, methodological, organizational, and economic questions engage the attention of citizens, educators, and politicians in many countries. As George Counts noted, education and society are in constant evolution, so the job of sorting out educational issues is never finished: today's solutions are the basis of tomorrow's problems. There will always be a need for educational critics.


NOTES
1.
William Boyd, From Locke to Montessori ( London: George G. Harrap, 1914),8.
2.
Boyd, From Locke to Montessori, 88, 91; E. M. Standing, Maria Montessori: Her Life and Work ( New York: New American Library, 1962), 32.

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Lives in Education: A Narrative of People and Ideas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Notes x
  • Contents xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - The Greeks 5
  • Notes 31
  • Chapter Two - The Romance 33
  • Notes 55
  • Chapter Three - The Monastics 57
  • Notes 91
  • Chapter Four - The Humanists 94
  • Notes 121
  • Chapter Five - The Reformers 123
  • Notes 148
  • Chapter Six - The New Educators 151
  • Notes 196
  • Chapter Seven - The Americans 198
  • Notes 235
  • Chapter Eight - The Friends of Education 239
  • Chapter Nine - The Progressives 273
  • Notes 310
  • Chapter Ten - The Outsiders 312
  • Notes 351
  • Chapter Eleven - The Critics 355
  • Notes 407
  • Chapter Twelve - The Paradigm Shifters 412
  • Notes 439
  • Epilogue 443
  • Notes 445
  • Contributors 447
  • Index 449
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