Teaching in a Secondary School

By Robert Griffin | Go to book overview

13
Discussions, Lectures, and Textbooks

Whatever subject you teach it is very likely that you now spend time leading discussions and lecturing, and undoubtedly you make at least some use of textbooks. If you haven't begun teaching yet, almost certainly discussions, lectures, and textbooks will be elements of your work when you do teach. They are for just about every teacher. With that in mind, I will pass along some ideas I have about each of these three features of classroom life.


DISCUSSIONS

We have all experienced discussions in one context or another. They are a pervasive methodology in schools. You know the way they operate. As the teacher, you introduce a topic or pose a question to the class and then field student responses for however long a time you have allotted to the activity. Along the way, you may choose to interject your own ideas and preferences into the process, or you might hold off on that and instead act as a nuetral facilitator of what the students have to say. As an instructional strategy, the discussion holds excellent promise. A well-handled discussion can provide students a way to expand and deepen their understanding of subject matter content. It can be a setting where students clarify and resolve issues inherent in the material they are studying. A discussion can be a place for students to explore meanings -- importance, connections, social and personal implications, and the like. It can be a chance for students to practice forcefully expressing what they know and value. Indeed, serious verbal exchange can be empowering for students. It is strengthening to display your wares in the

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Teaching in a Secondary School
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Teaching as Work 5
  • 2 - The Self-Surpassing Classroom 11
  • Conclusion 19
  • 3 - Our Values Matter 21
  • 4 - A Focus on Studenting 27
  • 5 - Getting Students to Think for Themselves 31
  • SUMMING UP 40
  • 6 - What is a Good Student Like? 41
  • Conclusion 48
  • 7 - The Importance of Language 50
  • 8 - What Can a Good Student Do? 65
  • Conclusion 71
  • 9 - Teaching Values: The Early Years 72
  • Conclusion 78
  • 10 - What Can Get in the Way of Being a Good Student? 80
  • 11 - Curriculum 88
  • 12 - Becoming a Good Student in School 114
  • 13 - Discussions, Lectures, and Textbooks 124
  • 14 - Motivation 138
  • 15 - Style Counts 149
  • 16 - Advice to a Student on Achieving in School 156
  • 17 - Teaching Values: The Later Years 162
  • 18 - Thoughts on Discipline 181
  • 19 - Helping Students Become More Effective in School 191
  • 20 - Evaluation 200
  • 21 - Planning 211
  • 22 - Teaching and You 229
  • Acknowledgments 239
  • Endnotes 240
  • Index 247
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