Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction

By Gerald R. Patterson | Go to book overview

3
Methodological Issues in the Study of Family Violence

Richard J. Gelles

University of Rhode Island

A review of the table of contents of social science journals published prior to 1970 would uncover virtually no articles on family violence. Readers would be left convinced that family violence was not a significant social problem. The reports of child abuse or occasional wife abuse that were tucked away in the middle pages of newspapers, emblazoned on the front pages of The National Enquirer, or presented as clinical case studies in social service and medical journals appeared to be rare aberrations which most certainly were the product of the mental illness of the offenders.

Today we know that violence in the home is a significant social problem with an estimated incidence far greater than the risk of experiencing violence on the streets. Research points to a problem that is not confined to a few mentally ill or emotionally disturbed individuals. Battered wives are not the cause of their victimization, nor are those who remain in violent homes masochists.

With the vision of hindsight we now assemble historical records and uncover centuries of violence and abuse between family members (see for example, Bakan, 1971; DeMause, 1974, 1975; Radbill, 1980; and Shorter, 1975). Additional research reveals that the pattern of violent family relationships cuts across cultures ( Gelles & Cornell, 1983; Korbin, 1981; Taylor & Newberger, 1979). Finally, research finds violence in virtually all family relations--victims not only include children and women, but young and elderly parents, siblings, and dating partners.

That there has been an explosion of research on all facets of family violence is obvious even to a casual consumer of the professional literature. Although there is an abundance of research, the collected body of knowledge is diverse, often contradictory; and frequently the data collected, and even published, fail to meet

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Depression and Aggression in Family Interaction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface xi
  • References xiv
  • 1: The Family Research Consortium: At the Crest of a Major Wave? 1
  • 2: Developmental Epidemiological Framework for Family Research on Depression and Aggression 11
  • References 46
  • 3: Methodological Issues in the Study of Family Violence 49
  • Conclusion 70
  • Acknowledgments 71
  • References 72
  • 4: How Marriages Change 75
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT 99
  • References 100
  • 5: A Contextual Approach to the Problem of Aversive Practices in Families 103
  • Conclusion 123
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 124
  • References 124
  • 6: Statistical Methods for Analyzing Family Interaction 131
  • Summary 165
  • Acknowledgments 165
  • References 166
  • 7: Family Environments of Depressed and Well Parents and Their Children: Issues of Research Methods 169
  • Conclusion 182
  • Acknowledgments 183
  • References 183
  • 8 - Maternal Depression, Marital Discord, and Children's Behavior: A Developmental Perspective 185
  • Acknowledgments 204
  • References 204
  • 9: Initiation and Maintenance of Process Disrupting Single- Mother Families 209
  • Acknowledgments 242
  • References 243
  • 10: Method Variance in Structural Equation Modeling: Living with "Glop" 247
  • References 276
  • 11: Reflections: A Conceptual Analysis and Synthesis 281
  • References 312
  • Author Index 315
  • Subject Index 325
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