Constructionism in Practice: Designing, Thinking, and Learning in a Digital World

By Yasmin Kafai; Mitchel Resnick | Go to book overview
highest temperature). Use other sensors to monitor the growth of the plant.
18. Build a LEGO machine that can water your plants. Then program a Brick to make the machine water the plants every few days.
19. Create a game where each player carries a Programmable Brick. Program the Bricks so that they give instructions to the players and send messages from one player to another.
20. Think up twenty more things to do with a Programmable Brick.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Seymour Papert, Steve Ocko, and Allan Toft have provided encouragement, inspiration, and ideas for the Programmable Brick project. Andrew Blumberg, Fei Hai Chua, Dennis Evangelista, Chris Gatta, Hanna Jang, Owen Johnson, Mark Neri, Darren Schmidt, Victor Tsou, and Elaine Yang all contributed to the development effort. The LEGO Group and the National Science Foundation (Grants 9153719-NMR and 9358519-RED) have provided financial support.


REFERENCES

Abelson H., & diSessa A. ( 1980). Turtle geometry: The computer as a medium for exploring mathematics. Cambridge, NM: MIT Press.

Bourgoin M. ( 1990). "Children using LEGO robots to explore dynamics". In I. Harel (Ed.), Constructionist learning (pp. 141-155). Cambridge, MA: MIT Media Laboratory.

Braitenberg V. ( 1984). Vehicles. Cambridge, NM: MIT Press.

Granott N. ( 1991). "Puzzled minds and weird creatures: Spontaneous inquiry and phases in knowledge construction". In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism (pp. 295-310). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Harvey B. ( 1985). Computer science logo style. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Hillis W. D. ( 1975). Ten things to do with a better computer (Unpublished memo.) Cambridge, MA: MIT Artificial Intelligence Lab.

Hillis W. D. ( 1985). The connection machine. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Hogg D., Martin F., & Resnick M. ( 1991). Braitenberg creatures (Epistemology and Learning Memo No. 13). Cambridge, MA: MIT Media Laboratory.

Martin F. ( 1988). Children, cybernetics, and programmable turtles. Unpublished master's thesis, MIT Media Laboratory, Cambridge, MA.

Papert S. ( 1980). Mindstorms: Children, computers, and powerful ideas. New York: Basic Books.

Papert S. ( 1991). "Situating constructionism". In I. Harel & S. Papert (Eds.), Constructionism (pp. 1- 11). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

Papert S., & Solomon C. ( 1971). Twenty things to do with a computer. (Artificial Intelligence Memo No. 248.) Cambridge, NM: Wr AI Laboratory.

Resnick M. ( 1993). "Behavior construction kits". Communications of the ACM, 36( 7):64-71.

Resnick M. ( 1994). Turtles, termites, and traffic jams. Cambridge, NM: MIT Press.

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Constructionism in Practice: Designing, Thinking, and Learning in a Digital World
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Contributors xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Acknowledgments 8
  • Part I - Perspectives in Constructionism 8a
  • 1 - A Word for Learning 9
  • References 24
  • 2 - Perspective-Taking and Object Construction 25
  • Conclusion 32
  • Acknowledgments 34
  • References 34
  • 3 - Elementary School Children's Images of Science 37
  • Introduction 37
  • Conclusions 62
  • Acknowledgments 64
  • Acknowledgments 65
  • Appendix B - Image of Science Interview Guideline 65
  • Part II - Learning Through Design 70a
  • 4 - Learning Design by Making Games Children's Development of Design Strategies in the Creation of a Complex Computational Artifact 71
  • Conclusion 93
  • Acknowledgments 94
  • References 94
  • 5 - Electronic Play Worlds 97
  • Conclusions 119
  • Acknowledgments 121
  • References 121
  • 6 - The Art of Design 125
  • Foreword 125
  • References 158
  • 7 - Building and Learning with Programmable Bricks 161
  • Introduction 161
  • References 172
  • Part III - Learning in Communities *
  • 8 - Social Constructionism and the Inner City Designing Environments for Social Development and Urban Renewal 175
  • Introduction 175
  • Acknowledgments 204
  • Appendix - Statistical Data About the Four Corners Neighborhood 204
  • References 205
  • 9 - The MediaMOO Project Constructionism and Professional Community 207
  • Conclusion - Constructionism and Virtual Reality 220
  • Acknowledgments 221
  • References 221
  • 10 - A Community of Designers Learning Through Exchanging Questions and Answers 223
  • Introduction 223
  • References 239
  • 11 - They Have Their Own Thoughts 241
  • Introduction 241
  • Conclusion 251
  • Acknowledgments 252
  • References 253
  • Part IV - Learning About Systems 254a
  • 12 - New Paradigms for Computing, New Paradigms for Thinking 255
  • Introduction 255
  • Acknowledgments 266
  • References 267
  • 13 - Making Sense of Probability Through Paradox and Programming A Case Study in a Connected Mathematics Framework 269
  • Introduction 269
  • Concluding Remarks 290
  • Acknowledgments 292
  • References 293
  • 14 - Ideal and Real Systems 297
  • Introduction 297
  • Analysis and Conclusions 318
  • Acknowledgments 322
  • References 322
  • Author Index 323
  • Subject Index 329
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