Doing History: Investigating with Children in Elementary and Middle Schools

By Linda S. Levstik ; Keith C. Barton | Go to book overview

ferent backgrounds, how to explain social problems, and whether to engage in warfare. Focusing on the 'motivations that influence such decisions helps students see history not as inevitable, but as subject to human reason, and to see the study of history as a way to apply reason to contemporary problems. Many of Amy's students, in fact, drew precisely that conclusion: They thought people studied history so they would know what not to do in the future. They consistently pointed out that history was worth studying so that they would know not to mistreat African Americans, women, Jews, or immigrants. Although some elementary students have a limited perception of contemporary racism, prejudice, and discrimination, others know from the media or their own experiences that these are indeed enduring issues in society. When asked whether she thought people's attitudes were different today than in the past, for example, one sixth-grade girl in a racially mixed urban area--whose class had been reading literature on the Holocaust--pointed to the skinheads, Klan, and "other kooks" in her neighborhood and concluded that not much had changed. "In my opinion," she said, "It could happen again."

Barton & Smith ( 1994)


CHILDREN'S AND ADOLESCENT LITERATURE

Women's Roles in Society

Blumberg R. Bloomers! Bradbury Press, 1993.

Chang I. A Separate Battle: Women and the Civil War. Lodestar, 1991.

Clinton S. The Story of Susan B. Anthony. Children's Press, 1986.

Coleman P. Rosie the Riveter. Crown, 1995.

Cullen-DuPont K. Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Women's Liberty. Facts on File, 1992.

Dash J. We Shall Not Be Moved: The Women's Factory Strike of 1909. Scholastic Press, 1996.

DePauw L. G. Founding Mothers: Women in America in the Revolutionary Era. Houghton Mifflin, 1975.

Duffy J. Radical Red. Charles Scribner's Sons, 1993.

Fritz J. You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton? Putnam, 1995.

Hearne B. Seven Brave Women. Greenwillow, 1997.

Hoople C. G. As I Saw It: Women Who Lived the American Adventure. Dial Press, 1978.

Johnston N. Remember the Ladies. Scholastic, 1995.

Landau E. Hidden Heroines and Women in American History. Julian Messner, 1975.

McCully E. A. The Ballot Box Battle. Knopf, 1996.

McCully E. A. The Bobbin Girl. Dial, 1996.

Macy S. A Whole New Ball Game: The Story of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. Henry Holt & Company, 1993.

O'Neal Z. A Long Way to Go. Viking, 1990.

Rappaport D. American Women: Their Lives in Their Words. Thomas Y. Crowell, 1990.

Sullivan G. The Day that Women Got the Vote: A Photo History of the Women's Rights Movement. Scholastic, 1994.


World War II Era and the Holocuast

Abells C. B. The Children We Remember. Greenwillow, 1986.

Adler D. A. Hilde and Elie: Children of the Holocaust. Holiday House, 1994.

Adler D. A. The Number on My Grandfather's Arm. Union of American Hebrew Congregations, 1987.

Adler D. A. A Picture Book of Anne Frank. Holiday House, 1993.

Avi. Who Was That Masked Man, Anyway? Orchard, 1992.

Bacharach S. D. Tell Them We Remember: The Story of the Holocaust. Little, Brown, 1994.

Chaikin M. A Nightmare in History: The Holocaust, 1933-1945. Houghton Mifflin, 1987.

-148-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Doing History: Investigating with Children in Elementary and Middle Schools
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.