Elitism, Populism, and European Politics

By Jack E. S. Hayward | Go to book overview

new privacy legislation if the press does not voluntarily accept more restraint.

All of this hints at a paradox, though an easily understood paradox: politicians outside Westminster are more tolerant of press freedom than the general public, while central government is less tolerant than the general public. So élites outside and inside government both fail to reflect the opinion of the general public with complete accuracy, but in opposite ways. Populists and liberals might agree on this fact but disagree on whether it is a problem and, still more, on how it might be resolved.


NOTES
1.
David Butler and Dennis Kavanagh, The British General Election of 1992 ( London: Macmillan, 1992), 268, 163, 201, 199.
2.
W. L. Miller, Media and Voters ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1991), 69.
3.
K. D. Ewing and C. A. Gearty, Freedom under Thatcher ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1990).
4.
Malcolm Hurwitt and Peter Thornton, Civil Liberty: The Liberty-NCCL Guide ( London: Penguin, 1989), ch. 2.
5.
Barrie Gunter and Paul Winstone, Television: The Public's View 1992 ( London: Libbey, 1993), 43.
8.
Miller, M edia and Voters, 109.
9.
Gunter and Winstone, Television, 56.
10.
Calculated from David Butler and Dennis Kavanagh, The British General Election of 1983 ( London: Macmillan, 1984), 178-9; and Butler and Kavanagh, The British General Election of 1992, 181-2.
11.
Miller, Media and Voters, 123.
13.
The analysis compared regular and persistent Guardian readers with regular and persistent Sun or Star readers (taken together), Mirror readers, Express or Mail readers (taken together), Telegraph, Times, or Financial Times readers (taken together), and those who did not read any particular paper regularly and persistently. See ibid. 123.
14.
The relationship between principles and practice is explored in W. L. Miller (ed.), Alternatives to Freedom: Arguments and Opinions ( London: Longman, 1995). See also W. L. Miller, A. M. Timpson, and M. Lessnoff, Principles and Practice: The Political Culture of People and Politicians in Contemporary Britain ( Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996).

-86-

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Elitism, Populism, and European Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • LIST OF CONTRIBUTORS x
  • Introduction Mediocre Élites Elected by Mediocre Peoples 1
  • Note 9
  • 1: The Populist Challenge to Élitist Democracy in Europe 10
  • Notes 30
  • 2 - 'Losing Touch' in a Democracy: Demands Versus Needs 33
  • Notes 60
  • 3: Freedom from the Press 67
  • Notes 86
  • 4: From Representative to Responsive Government? 88
  • Notes 99
  • 5: The European Union, the Political Class, and the People 101
  • Notes 120
  • 6: Political Parties and the Public Accountability of Leaders 121
  • Notes 141
  • 7: Élite-Mass Linkages in Europe: Legitimacy Crisis or Party Crisis? 143
  • Notes 160
  • 8: Organized Interests as Intermediaries 164
  • Notes 186
  • 9: Mediating between the Powerless and the Powerful 190
  • Notes 202
  • 10: Public Demands and Economic Constraints: All Italians Now? 203
  • Notes 219
  • 11: The Fluctuating Rationale of Monetary Union 220
  • 4: Conclusion 235
  • Notes 237
  • 12: Has Government by Committee Lost the Public's Confidence? 238
  • Notes 249
  • Conclusion Has European Unification by Stealth a Future? 252
  • Notes 257
  • Index 259
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