John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism

By Barbara Arneil | Go to book overview

4
Colonialism: Economic and Ethical Debates

J0HN L0CKE'S passionate interest in England's colonial affairs is well documented. Maurice Cranston writes in his biography of Locke and his patron: ' Locke was easily infected with Ashley's zeal for commercial imperialism, seeing as clearly as his patron saw the possibilities it offered for personal and national enrichment.'1 Locke was not only interested in the ideas but deeply immersed in the development of actual colonial policy as secretary to the Lords Proprietors of Carolina from 1668 to 1675, through his work for the 1672-6 Council of Trade, and as Commissioner for the Board of Trade and Plantations from 1695 to 1700. In each of these capacities, he played an important role in formulating the policies to be implemented.

The key figure in the Carolina project was Lord Shaftesbury and at his side was Locke. The latter's workload was enormous. There is considerable evidence of the extent to which colonial policy dominated Locke's life from 1668 to 1675. From the colonial records of Carolina, one can see that most of the letters between the Lord Proprietors and the Council in Carolina were endorsed by Locke, some of the laws, including the Temporary Laws of 1674, were handwritten and sent by him, and copious notes summarizing the activities were recorded in his own hand. In addition, he wrote to senior officials in the colonies of the Bahamas and Carolina, including Joseph West, Peter Colleton, and Henry Woodward of his own accord during this time. Finally, he was responsible, in conjunction

____________________
1
Maurice Cranston, John Locke: A Biography ( Oxford, 1957; paperback edn., 1985), 119.

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
John Locke and America: The Defence of English Colonialism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Locke's Travel Books 21
  • 2 - Colonialism and Natural Law 45
  • 3 - English Colonialism 65
  • 4 - Colonialism: Economic and Ethical Debates 88
  • 5 - Carolina: a Colonial Blueprint 118
  • 6 - Colonialism: Locke's Theory of Property 132
  • 7 - Locke, Jefferson, and the Amerindian 168
  • 8 - Conclusion 201
  • Bibliography 212
  • Index 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.