Sexuality and the Reading Encounter: Identity and Desire in Proust, Duras, Tournier, and Cixous

By Emma Wilson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the editors of French Studies and Dalhousie French Studies for permission to draw on material used in articles for those journals. Part of Chapter 5, which has appeared in article form, is reprinted by permission from the Romanic Review, 87, 1 ( January 1996). Copyright by the Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York. I am especially grateful to Andrew Lockett and Jason Freeman of Oxford University Press for their encouragement and invaluable advice at various stages in the writing of this book. I am greatly indebted also to Leslie Hill, whose astute and clear-sighted comments helped me re-form and clarify my ideas. Thanks are due as well to Laurien Berkeley, Helen Gray, Vicki Reeve, and Sophie Goldsworthy for their help in the production of this book. Michel Tournier was kind enough to answer my questions in an informal interview in Paris in 1990: I am very grateful to him.

I have been thinking about some of these ideas for almost ten years now, since I was first inspired as an undergraduate by the teaching of J. Ann Duncan. I have since benefited from the judicious and generous guidance of my research supervisors Rosemary Lloyd and Alison Finch. Discussions with Colin Davis have rarefied and changed my thoughts on Tournier. I owe a great deal to them all. I am very grateful also to the Master and Fellows of Corpus Christi College and to colleagues in the French Department in Cambridge for their support and example. Amongst the many people to whom I am indebted, I would like to thank in particular Ann Caesar, Peter Collier, Nick Corbyn, David Cresswell, Jenny Davey, Patrick Higgins, Anna Lawrence, Tim Seaton, and Meryl Tyers. Josephine Lloyd has been a tender and thoughtful friend in the years I have been working on this book: I am very grateful to her. Finally, I'd like to thank my parents, Millar and Jacqueline Wilson, for the love and freedom they've given me.

-xi-

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Sexuality and the Reading Encounter: Identity and Desire in Proust, Duras, Tournier, and Cixous
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contents xiii
  • 1 - The Reading Encounter 1
  • 2 - Identity and Identification 29
  • 3 - Reading Albertine's Sexuality; Or, 'Why Not Think of Marcel Simply as a Lesbian?' 60
  • 4 - 'La Passion Selon H.C.': Reading in the Feminine 95
  • 5 - 'La Chair ouverte, blessCB)e' 130
  • Concluding Remarks 192
  • Bibliography 199
  • Index 209
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