Law, Society, and Economy: Centenary Essays for the London School of Economics and Political Science, 1895-1995

By Richard Rawlings | Go to book overview

10
Crime and Politics: Spot the Difference*

STANLEY COHEN

This essay is about the relationships between crime and politics. It also includes a slightly self-indulgent sub-text: a glance at what happened to some ideas from the 'new criminology' movement which so involved many of us thirty years ago.

I start with two texts--not 'Texts' with a capital T in the literary, post- modernist sense, but texts in the old fashioned sense, that priests, rabbis and mullahs use for their sermons.

The first is very familiar to criminologists : a much-quoted passage from one of the most influential books of the period, David Matza Becoming Deviant--a text very much resonating the culture of the 1960s (and conceived by Matza while he was a visitor at the LSE in 1967/8). With characteristic irony, he records the uncoupling of modern criminology from politics: 'Among their most notable accomplishments, the criminological positivists succeeded in what would seem the impossible. They separated the study of crime from the workings and theory of the state.'.1

My second text is less familiar to criminoloizists, but more to everyone else. It's from John Le Carrd recent novel, The Night Manager. This is the scene: the Cold War is over; there is no more pretence at ideology; history has come to an end. The new enemy is the callous international cartels of drug-trafficking, illegal arms-trading and money-laundering. Burr, the agent for the law enforcement division of the revamped British intelligence services, now deals not with the old politics but the new crime. In one scene in Zurich, he is trying to recruit our hero, Jonathan Pine, to help bring to justice a particularly obnoxious dealer in illegal arms and drugs:

____________________
*
A revised version of a lecture delivered on 9 May 1995. I am indebted to the Department of Law and Sociology for their invitation to give the lecture and to Nils Christie, Ann Peters and Jim Sheptycki for useful references. An earlier version appears (in German) in Trutz von Trotha (ed.), Power and the Discourse on Crime: Festschrift for Fritz Sack ( Hamburg, 1996). This version was previously published in ( 1996) 47 British Journal of Sociology1.
1
D. Matza Becoming Deviant (Englewood Cliff, New Jersey, 1969) 143.

-225-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Law, Society, and Economy: Centenary Essays for the London School of Economics and Political Science, 1895-1995
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 390

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.